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Connection Oriented Networks - Perros H.G

Perros H.G Connection Oriented Networks - John Wiley & Sons, 2005. - 359 p.
ISBN 0-470-02163-2
Download (direct link): connectionorientednetworks2005.pdf
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To see how MPLS works, let us consider an MPLS domain consisting of five LSRs (LSRs A, B, C, D, and E), all linked with point-to-point connections as shown in Figure 6.5. LSRs A and C are connected to non-MPLS IP domains 1 and 2, respectively. Assume that a new set of hosts with the prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0), where x.0.0.0 is the base network address and y.0.0.0 is the mask, is directly connected to E. The flow of IP packets with this prefix from A to E is via B and D. That is, Aís next hop router for this prefix is B, Bís next hop router is D, and Dís next hop router is E. Likewise, the flow of IP packets with the same prefix from C to E is via D. That is, Cís next hop
THE MULTI-PROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING (MPLS) ARCHITECTURE
139
router for this prefix is D, and Dís next hop router is E. The interfaces in Figure 6.5 show how these routers are interconnected. For instance, A is connected to B via if0, and B is connected to A, C, and D via if1, if2, and if0, respectively.
When a LSR identifies the FEC associated with this new prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0), it selects a label from a pool of free labels and it makes an entry into a table referred to as the label forward information base (LFIB). This table contains information regarding the incoming and outgoing labels associated with a FEC and the output interface, i.e. the FECís next hop router. The LSR also saves the label in its FIB in the entry associated with the FEC.
The entry in the LFIB associated with this particular FEC for each LSR is shown in Table 6.2. (For presentation purposes we have listed all of the entries together in a single table). Note that B has selected an incoming label equal to 62; D has selected 15; and E has selected 60. Since A and C are MPLS edge routers and do not expect to receive labeled IP packets, they have not selected an incoming label for this FEC. The remaining information in each entry gives the next hop LSR and the output interface for the FEC. So for this FEC, the next hop router for A is B, and is through if0.
An incoming label is the label that a LSR expects to find in all of the incoming IP packets that belong to a FEC. For instance, in the above example, LSR B expects all of the incoming IP packets belonging to the FEC associated with the prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0) to be labeled with the value 62. The labeling of these packets has to be done by the LSRs which are upstream of B. That is, they are upstream in relation to the flow of IP packets associated with this FEC. In this example, the only LSP that is upstream of B is A. In the case of D, both B and C are upstream LSRs.
In order for an LSR to receive incoming IP packets labeled with the value that it has selected, the LSR has to notify its neighbours about its label selection for a particular FEC. In the above example, LSR B sends its information to A, D, and C. A recognizes that it is upstream from B, and it uses the information to update the entry for this FEC in its LFIB. As far as this FEC is concerned, D and C are not upstream from B, and they do not use this information in their LFIBs. However, they can chose to store it for future use. For example, a C-to-D link failure could make B the next hop LSR for this FEC. In this case, C will use the label advertised by B to update the entry in its LFIB.
D sends its information to B, C, and E. Since B and C are both upstream of D, they use this information to update the entries in their LFIB. Finally, E sends its information
Table 6.2 FEC entry in each LFIB.
LSR Incoming Outgoing Next Outgoing
label label hop interface
A _ _ LSR B if0
B 62 _ LSR D if0
C _ _ LSR D if2
D 15 _ LSR E if2
E 60 _ LSR E if0
140 THE MULTI-PROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING (MPLS) ARCHITECTURE
Table 6.3 FEC entry in each LFIB with label binding information.
LFIB Incoming Outgoing Next Outgoing
label label hop interface
A _ 62 LSR B if0
B 62 15 LSR D if0
C _ 15 LSR D if2
D 15 60 LSR E if2
E 60 _ LSR E if0
to D, which uses it to update its entry in its LFIB. As a result, each entry in the LFIB of each LSR will be modified (see Table 6.3).
For LSR E, the next hop is E itself. This indicates that the IP packets associated with the prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0) will be forwarded to the local destination over if 0 using their prefix.
Once the labels have been distributed and the entries have been updated in the LFIBs, the forwarding of an IP packet belonging to the FEC associated with the prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0) is done using solely the labels. Let us assume that A receives an IP packet from the non-MPLS IP domain 1 with a prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0). A identifies that the packetís IP address belongs to the FEC, and it looks up its LFIB to obtain the label value and the outgoing interface. It sets the label value to 62, encapsulates it using the format shown in Figure 6.3, and forwards it to the outgoing interface if0. When the IP packet arrives at LSR B, its label is extracted and looked up in Bís LFIB. The old label is replaced by the new one, which is 15, and the IP packet is forwarded to interface if0. LSR D follows exactly the same procedure. When it receives the IP packet from B, it replaces its incoming label with the outgoing label, which is 60, and forwards it to interface if2. Finally, E forwards the IP packet to its local destination. The same procedure applies for an IP packet with a prefix (x.0.0.0, y.0.0.0) that arrives at C from the non-MPLS domain 2.
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