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Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Boyce W.E.

Boyce W.E. Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - John Wiley & Sons, 2001. - 1310 p.
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequations2001.pdf
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> 2. (a) Show that the linear approximation valid near the critical point P2 is given by Eq. (8).
(b) Show that the eigenvalues of the system (8) satisfy Eq. (9).
(c) For r = 28 solve Eq. (9) and thereby determine the eigenvalues of the system (8).
> 3. (a) By solving Eq. (9) numerically show that the real part of the complex roots changes
sign when r = 24.737.
(b) Show that a cubic polynomial x3 + Ax2 + Bx + C has one real zero and two pure imaginary zeros only if AB = C.
(c) By applying the result of part (b) to Eq. (9) show that the real part of the complex roots changes sign when r = 470/19.
4. Use the Liapunov function V(x, y, z) = x2 + - y2 + a z2 to show that the origin is a globally asymptotically stable critical point for the Lorenz equations (1) if r < 1.
5. Consider the ellipsoid
V(x, y, z) = rx2 + ay2 + a(z 2r)2 = c > 0.
(a) Calculate dV/dt along trajectories of the Lorenz equations (1).
(b) Determine a sufficient condition on c so that every trajectory crossing V(x, y, z) = c is directed inward.
(c) Evaluate the condition found in part (b) for the case a = 10, b = 8/3, r = 28.
In each of Problems 6 through 10 carry out the indicated investigations of the Lorenz equations.
> 6. For r = 28 plot x versus t for the cases shown in Figures 9.8.2 and 9.8.3. Do your graphs
agree with those shown in the figures? Recall the discussion of numerical computation in the text.
> 7. For r = 28 plot the projections in the xy- and xz-planes, respectively, of the trajectory
starting at the point (5, 5, 5). Do the graphs agree with those in Figures 9.8.5 and 9.8.6?
> 8. (a) For r = 21 plot x versus t for the solutions starting at the initial points (3, 8, 0),
(5, 5, 5), and (5, 5, 10). Use a t interval of at least 0 < t < 30. Compare your graphs with those in Figure 9.8.4.
9.8 Chaos and Strange Attractors: The Lorenz Equations
539
(b) Repeat the calculation in part (a) for r = 22, r = 23, and r = 24. Increase the t interval as necessary so that you can determine when each solution begins to converge to one of the critical points. Record the approximate duration of the chaotic transient in each case. Describe how this quantity depends on the value of r.
(c) Repeat the calculations in parts (a) and (b) for values of r slightly greater than 24. Try to estimate the value of r for which the duration of the chaotic transient approaches infinity.
> 9. For certain r intervals, or windows, the Lorenz equations exhibit a period-doubling prop-
erty similar to that of the logistic difference equation discussed in Section 2.9. Careful calculations may reveal this phenomenon.
(a) One period-doubling window contains the value r = 100. Let r = 100 and plot the trajectory starting at (5, 5, 5) or some other initial point of your choice. Does the solution appear to be periodic? What is the period?
(b) Repeat the calculation in part (a) for slightly smaller values of r. When r = 99.98, you may be able to observe that the period of the solution doubles. Try to observe this result by performing calculations with nearby values of r.
(c) As r decreases further, the period of the solution doubles repeatedly. The next period doubling occurs at about r = 99.629. Try to observe this by plotting trajectories for nearby values of r.
> 10. Now consider values of r slightly larger than those in Problem 9.
(a) Plot trajectories of the Lorenz equations for values of r between 100 and 100.78. You should observe a steady periodic solution for this range of r values.
(b) Plot trajectories for values of r between 100.78 and 100.8. Determine as best you can how and when the periodic trajectory breaks up.
REFERENCES There are many recent books that expand on the material treated in this chapter, for example:
Drazin, P. G., Nonlinear Systems (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).
Glendinning, P., Stability, Instability, and Chaos (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994). Grimshaw, R., Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations (Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1990).
Two books that are especially notable from the point of view of applications are:
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