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Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Boyce W.E.

Boyce W.E. Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - John Wiley & Sons, 2001. - 1310 p.
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequations2001.pdf
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dt
Hence
(t)y = j (s)g(s) ds + c,
so the general solution ofEq. (3) is
= f iAs)g(s) ds + c (35)
y i(t) '
Observe that, to find the solution given by Eq. (35), two integrations are required: one
to obtain i(t) from Eq. (33) and the other to obtain y from Eq. (35).
Solve the initial value problem
t/ + 2 y = 4t2, (36)
y(1) = 2. (37)
Rewriting Eq. (36) in the standard form (3), we have
/ + (2/t)y = 4t, (38)
so p(t) = 2/1 and g(t) = 4t .To solve Eq. (38) we first compute the integrating factor
l(t):
l(t) = exp J 2 dt = e2ln|t| = t2. (39)
On multiplying Eq. (38) by i(t) = t2, we obtain
t2 y + 2ty = (t2 y/ = 4t3,
and therefore
t2 y = t4 + c, where c is an arbitrary constant. It follows that
c
y = t2 + - (40)
t2
2.1 Linear Equations with Variable Coefficients
37
is the general solution of Eq. (36). Integral curves of Eq. (36) for several values of c are shown in Figure 2.1.4. To satisfy the initial condition (37) it is necessary to choose c = 1; thus
21
y = t2 + j, t > 0 (41)
is the solution of the initial value problem (36), (37). This solution is shown by the heavy curve in Figure 2.1.4. Note that it becomes unbounded and is asymptotic to the positive y-axis as t ^ 0 from the right. This is the effect of the infinite discontinuity in the coefficient p(t) at the origin. The function y = t2 + (1/12) for t < 0 is not part of the solution of this initial value problem.
This is the first example in which the solution fails to exist for some values of t. Again, this is due to the infinite discontinuity in p(t) at t = 0, which restricts the solution to the interval 0 < t < to.
Looking again at Figure 2.1.4, we see that some solutions (those for which c > 0) are asymptotic to the positive y-axis as t ^ 0 from the right, while other solutions (for which c < 0) are asymptotic to the negative y-axis. The solution for which c = 0, namely, y = t2, remains bounded and differentiable even at t = 0. If we generalize the initial condition (37) to
y(1) = , (42)
then c = yc - 1 and the solution (41) becomes
y = t2 + -, t > 0. (43)
t2
As in Example 3, this is another instance where there is a critical initial value, namely, yc = 1, that separates solutions that behave in two quite different ways.
38
Chapter 2. First Order Differential Equations
PROBLEMS
In each of Problems 1 through 12:
(a) Draw a direction field for the given differential equation.
(b) Based on an inspection of the direction field, describe how solutions behave for large t.
(c) Find the general solution of the given differential equation and use it to determine how solutions behave as t .
1. + 3y = t + e-2t > 2. %
2t
=
y
2
-
3. y + y = te-t + 1 > 4. y + (1/t)y = 3cos ;2t, t > 0
5. /- 2y = 3e' > 6. ty + 2 y = sin t, t>0
7. + 2ty = 2te-2 > 8. (1 + t2) y + 4ty = 2
-)
t
9. 2 + y = 3t > 10. ty - y = t2e-t
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