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Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Boyce W.E.

Boyce W.E. Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - John Wiley & Sons, 2001. - 1310 p.
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequations2001.pdf
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a1 a4 a1 a7 a1
a = -----, a, = ------=-------, a,n =--------------------------------------=-,
4 3-4 7 6-7 3 ^-6- 10 9-10 3-4-6-7-910
4Sir George Airy (1801-1892), an English astronomer and mathematician, was director of the Greenwich Observa-
tory from 1835 to 1881. One reason Airys equation is of interest is that for x negative the solutions are oscillatory,
similar to trigonometric functions, and for x positive they are monotonic, similar to hyperbolic functions. Can
you explain why it is reasonable to expect such behavior?
244
Chapter 5. Series Solutions of Second Order Linear Equations
In the same way as before we find that
1
3n+1 3 4 6 7 (3 - 3)(3 - 2)(3)(3 + 1)!
The general solution of Airys equation is
= ao
3
1 +
+
2-3 2-3-5-6
+ ...+
2 3 (3 - 1)(3)
= 1, 2, 3,
+
+ a1
3+1
x +
+
3 4 3 4 6 7
+ +
3 4 (3)(3 + 1)
+
= a
1+ ?
3
2 3 (3 - 1)(3)
+ a.
+ E
1
3+1
3 4 (3)(3 + 1)
(17)
Having obtained these two series solutions, we can now investigate their convergence. Because of the rapid growth of the denominators of the terms in the series (17), we might expect these series to have a large radius of convergence. Indeed, it is easy to use the ratio test to show that both these series converge for all x; see Problem 20.
Assuming for the moment that the series do converge for all x, let y1 and y2 denote the functions defined by the expressions in the first and second sets of brackets, respectively, in Eq. (17). Then, by first choosing a0 = 1, a1 = 0 and then a0 = 0, a1 =
1, it follows that y1 and y2 are individually solutions ofEq. (12). Notice that y1 satisfies the initial conditions y1(0) = 1, y1 (0) = 0 and that y2 satisfies the initial conditions y2(0) = 0, y2(0) = 1. Thus W(yv y2)(0) = 1 = 0, and consequently y1 and y2 are linearly independent. Hence the general solution of Airys equation is
= a0 y1(x) + a1 y2(x),
00 < x <00.
In Figures 5.2.3 and 5.2.4, respectively, we show the graphs of the solutions y1 and 2 of Airys equation, as well as graphs of several partial sums of the two series in Eq. (17). Again, the partial sums provide local approximations to the solutions in a neighborhood of the origin. While the quality of the approximation improves as the number of terms increases, no polynomial can adequately represent y1 and y2 for large |x|. A practical way to estimate the interval in which a given partial sum is reasonably accurate is to compare the graphs of that partial sum and the next one, obtained by including one more term. As soon as the graphs begin to separate noticeably, one can be confident that the original partial sum is no longer accurate. For example, in Figure 5.2.3 the graphs for = 24 and = 27 begin to separate at about x = 9/2. Thus, beyond this point, the partial sum of degree 24 is worthless as an approximation to the solution.
Observe that both y1 and y2 are monotone for x > 0 and oscillatory for x < 0. One can also see from the figures that the oscillations are not uniform, but decay in amplitude and increase in frequency as the distance from the origin increases. In contrast to Example 1, the solutions y1 and y2 of Airys equation are not elementary functions that you have already encountered in calculus. However, because of their importance in some physical applications, these functions have been extensively studied and their properties are well known to applied mathematicians and scientists.
3
6
x
x
4
7
x
x
x
5.2 Series Solutions near an Ordinary Point, Part I
245
EXAMPLE
3
I
3 24 12 y n = 3
CD 0 18 2 n > 6
3 1 1 1 6 1 1
2 1 1 1
42
CO _
4
3 _
^ _
-10 \ - 8 - -2 2 x
39 5 9 3 -2
n = 45 33
FIGURE 5.2.3 Polynomial approximations to the solution y^ (x) of Airys equation. The value of n is the degree of the approximating polynomial.
6 y n > 4
S - 34 22 10 2 1 1 >
28 16 4
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
\-10/ \-8 / 6 / 4 \ -2 2 x
n = 49 37 25 13
43 2 ---
-
7
9
31
FIGURE 5.2.4 Polynomial approximations to the solution y2 (x) of Airys equation. The value of n is the degree of the approximating polynomial.
Find a solution of Airys equation in powers of x 1.
The point x = 1 is an ordinary point of Eq. (12), and thus we look for a solution of the form
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