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Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Boyce W.E.

Boyce W.E. Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - John Wiley & Sons, 2001. - 1310 p.
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequations2001.pdf
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16. Find a formula involving integrals for a particular solution of the differential equation
/" 3/ + 3 y = g(t).
If g(t) = t2et, determine Y(t).
17. Find a formula involving integrals for a particular solution of the differential equation
x3/" 3X2/ + 6xy 6y = g(x), x > 0.
Hint: Verify that x, x2, and x3 are solutions of the homogeneous equation.
REFERENCES
Coddington, E. A., An Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1961; New York: Dover, 1989).
Ince, E. L., Ordinary Differential Equations (London: Longmans, Green, 1927; New York: Dover, 1953).
CHAPTER
5
Series Solutions of Second Order Linear Equations
Finding the general solution of a linear differential equation rests on determining a fundamental set of solutions of the homogeneous equation. So far, we have given a systematic procedure for constructing fundamental solutions only if the equation has constant coefficients. To deal with the much larger class of equations having variable coefficients it is necessary to extend our search for solutions beyond the familiar elementary functions of calculus. The principal tool that we need is the representation of a given function by a power series. The basic idea is similar to that in the method of undetermined coefficients: We assume that the solutions of a given differential equation have power series expansions, and then we attempt to determine the coefficients so as to satisfy the differential equation.
5.1 Review of Power Series
In this chapter we discuss the use of power series to construct fundamental sets of solutions of second order linear differential equations whose coefficients are functions of the independent variable. We begin by summarizing very briefly the pertinent results about power series that we need. Readers who are familiar with power series may go on to Section 5.2. Those who need more details than are presented here should consult a book on calculus.
231
232
Chapter 5. Series Solutions of Second Order Linear Equations
1. A power series an (x x0)n is said to converge at a point x if
n=0
lim ] an (x x0)n
m-- u
n0
exists for that x. The series certainly converges for x = x0; it may converge for all x, or it may converge for some values of x and not for others.
TO
2. The series an (x x0)n is said to converge absolutely at a point x if the series
n=0 n 0
2_^K (x x0)n 1 = l^lan ||x x0|n
n=0 n=0
converges. It can be shown that if the series converges absolutely, then the series also converges; however, the converse is not necessarily true.
3. One of the most useful tests for the absolute convergence of a power series is the ratio test. If a = 0, and if for a fixed value of x
lim
n^TO
an + 1(x x0)n + 1
an (x x0)n
= |x x0| lim
n+1
= L |x x01,
then the power series converges absolutely at that value of x if |x x0| < 1/L, and diverges if |x x0| > 1/L. If |x x0| = 1/L, the test is inconclusive.
a
n
For which values of x does the power series
TO
Yj(1)n+1n(x 2)n
n=1
converge?
To test for convergence we use the ratio test. We have
lim
n
(1)n+2(n + 1)(x 2)
n+1
(\)n+1n(x 2)n
= |x 2| lim
= |x 2|.
According to statement 3 the series converges absolutely for |x 2| < 1, or 1 < x < 3, and diverges for |x 2| > 1. The values of x corresponding to |x 2| = 1 are x = 1 and x = 3. The series diverges for each of these values of x since the nth term of the series does not approach zero as n ^to.
1
n
n
TO
4. If the power series an (x x0)n converges at x = x1, it converges absolutely
n=0 n 0 1
for |x x0| < |x1 x01; and if it diverges at x = x1, it diverges for |x x0| >
|x1 x01.
5. There is a nonnegative number p, called the radius of convergence, such that
TO
Y.an (x x0)n converges absolutely for |x x0| < p and diverges for |x x01 >
n=0 n 0 0 0
p. For a series that converges only at x0, we define p to be zero; for a series that
5.1 Review of Power Series
233
converges for all x, we say that p is infinite. If p > 0, then the interval |x x01 < p is called the interval of convergence; it is indicated by the hatched lines in Figure
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