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Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Boyce W.E.

Boyce W.E. Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - John Wiley & Sons, 2001. - 1310 p.
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequations2001.pdf
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WV-----------------1(-----1
Inductance L
-----------------------/
Impressed voltage E(t)
FIGURE 3.8.9 A simple electric circuit.
196
Chapter 3. Second Order Linear Equations
The flow of current in the circuit is governed by Kirchhoffs9 second law: In a closed
circuit, the impressed voltage is equal to the sum ofthe voltage drops in the rest ofthe circuit.
According to the elementary laws of electricity, we know that:
The voltage drop across the resistor is IR.
The voltage drop across the capacitor is Q/ C.
The voltage drop across the inductor is LdI/dt.
Hence, by Kirchhoffs law,
The units have been chosen so that 1 volt = 1 ohm 1 ampere = 1 coulomb/1 farad =
1 henry 1 ampere/1 second.
Substituting for I from Eq. (31), we obtain the differential equation
Thus we must know the charge on the capacitor and the current in the circuit at some initial time t0.
Alternatively, we can obtain a differential equation for the current I by differentiating Eq. (33) with respect to t, and then substituting for dQ/dt from Eq. (31). The result is
Hence I0 is also determined by the initial charge and current, which are physically measurable quantities.
The most important conclusion from this discussion is that the flow of current in the circuit is described by an initial value problem of precisely the same form as the one that describes the motion of a spring-mass system. This is a good example of the unifying role of mathematics: Once you know how to solve second order linear equations with constant coefficients, you can interpret the results either in terms of mechanical vibrations, electric circuits, or any other physical situation that leads to the same problem.
9Gustav Kirchhoff (1824-1887), professor at Breslau, Heidelberg, and Berlin, was one of the leading physicists of the nineteenth century. He discovered the basic laws of electric circuits about 1845 while still a student at Konigsberg. He is also famous for fundamental work in electromagnetic absorption and emission and was one of the founders of spectroscopy.
Ld-Tt + RI + 1 Q = E (t).
dt C
(32)
LQ' + RQ + C q = e(t)
(33)
(34)
LI" + RI' + CI = E'(t),
(35)
with the initial conditions
I(t0) = I0> I (t0) = I0.
(36)
From Eq. (32) it follows that
E(t0) RI0 (I/ C) Q0
(37)
L
3.8 Mechanical and Electrical Vibrations
197
PROBLEMS
> 5. A mass weighing 2 lb stretches a spring 6 in. If the mass is pulled down an additional 3 in.
and then released, and if there is no damping, determine the position u of the mass at any time t. Plot u versus t. Find the frequency, period, and amplitude of the motion.
6. A mass of 100 g stretches a spring 5 cm. If the mass is set in motion from its equilibrium position with a downward velocity of 10 cm/sec, and if there is no damping, determine the position u of the mass at any time t. When does the mass first return to its equilibrium position?
7. A mass weighing 3 lb stretches a spring 3 in. If the mass is pushed upward, contracting the spring a distance of 1 in., and then set in motion with a downward velocity of 2 ft/sec, and if there is no damping, find the position u of the mass at any time t. Determine the frequency, period, amplitude, and phase of the motion.
8. A series circuit has a capacitor of 0.25 x 106 farad and an inductor of 1 henry. If the initial charge on the capacitor is 106 coulomb and there is no initial current, find the charge Q on the capacitor at any time t.
> 9. A mass of 20 g stretches a spring 5 cm. Suppose that the mass is also attached to a
viscous damper with a damping constant of 400 dyne-sec/cm. If the mass is pulled down an additional 2 cm and then released, find its position u at any time t. Plot u versus t. Determine the quasi frequency and the quasi period. Determine the ratio of the quasi period to the period of the corresponding undamped motion. Also find the time such that | u(t) | < 0.05 cm for all t > .
> 10. A mass weighing 16 lb stretches a spring 3 in. The mass is attached to a viscous damper
with a damping constant of 2 lb-sec/ft. If the mass is set in motion from its equilibrium position with a downward velocity of 3 in./sec, find its position u at any time t. Plot u versus t. Determine when the mass first returns to its equilibrium position. Also find the time such that |u(t)| < 0.01 in. for all t > .
11. A spring is stretched 10 cm by a force of 3 newtons. A mass of 2 kg is hung from the spring
and is also attached to a viscous damper that exerts a force of 3 newtons when the velocity of the mass is 5 m/sec. If the mass is pulled down 5 cm below its equilibrium position and
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