Books
in black and white
Main menu
Share a book About us Home
Books
Biology Business Chemistry Computers Culture Economics Fiction Games Guide History Management Mathematical Medicine Mental Fitnes Physics Psychology Scince Sport Technics
Ads

Handbook of clinical Hypnosis - Burrows G.D.

Burrows G.D., Stanley R.O. Handbook of clinical Hypnosis - Wiley publishing , 2001. - 352 p.
ISBN 0-471-97009-3
Download (direct link): handbookofclinicalhypnosis2001.pdf
Previous << 1 .. 46 47 48 49 50 51 < 52 > 53 54 55 56 57 58 .. 189 >> Next

I am not promoting a Machiavellian stance for the therapist. The job of the therapist is to work on the patient’s behalf to elicit change. This can only be accomplished when the therapist controls, defines and induces different roles by assuming the one-up position.
CONCLUSION
Keep in mind that it is the injunctive nature of the communication, not the actual words and actions of the therapist, that provides the pivotal stimulus for patient change. The therapist must work to develop an understanding of the covert messages to which the patient will respond.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author wishes to acknowledge the assistance of Brent Geary, PhD, and Jean M. Emery, MA, MFA, in the preparation of this chapter.
REFERENCES
Bandler, R. & Grinder, J. (1975). The Structure of Magic, Vol. 1. Palo Alto, CA: Science and behavior Books.
Bateson, G. & Ruesch, J. (1951). Communication: The Social Matrix of Psychiatry. New York: W. W. Norton.
Berne, E. (1966). Principles of Group Treatment. New York: Grove Press.
Erickson, M. H. (1966). The interspersal technique for symptom correction and pain control.
Am. J. Clin. Hypn. 8, 198-209.
Erickson, M. H. & Rossi, E. L. (1979). Hypnotherapy: An Exploratory Casebook. New York: Irvington.
Fisch, R., Weakland, H. H. & Segal, L. (1982). The Tactics of Change: Doing Therapy Briefly. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Haley, J. (1963). Strategies of Psychotherapy. New York: Grune & Stratton.
94
INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOK OF CLINICAL HYPNOSIS
Haley, J. (1973). Uncommon Therapy. New York: W. W. Norton.
Madanes, C. (1984). Behind the One Way Mirror: Advances in the Practice of Strategic Therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Watzlawick, P., Beavin, J. H. & Jackson, D. (1967). Pragmatics of Human Communication. New York: W. W. Norton.
Watzlawick, P, Weakland, J. & Fisch, R. (1974). Change: Principles of Problem Formation and Problem Resolution. New York: W. W. Norton.
Watzlawick, P. (1985). Hypnotherapy without trance. In J. K. Zeig (Ed.), Ericksonian Psychotherapy, Vol. 1: Structures. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Yapko, M. D. (1985). The Erickson hook: Values in Ericksonian approaches. In J. K. Zeig (Ed.), Ericksonian Psychotherapy, l:Vol I: Structures. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Zeig, J. K. (1982). Ericksonian approaches to promote abstinence from cigarette smoking. In J. K. Zeig (Ed.), Ericksonian Approaches to Hypnosis and Psychotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Zeig, J. K. (1985a). Experiencing Erickson: An Introduction to the Man and his Work. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Zeig, J. K. (1985b). Ethical issues in Ericksonian hypnosis: Informed consent and training standards. In J. K. Zeig (Ed.), Ericksonian Psychotherapy, Vol. 1: Structures. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
Zeig, J. K. (1988a). The grammar of change. Int. J. Eclectic Psychother., 7(4), 410-414.
Zeig, J. K. (1988b). An Ericksonian phenomenological approach to therapeutic hypnotic induction and symptom utilization. In J. K. Zeig & Stephen Lankton (Eds), Developing Ericksonian Therapy: State of the Art. New York: Brunner/Mazel.
International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis. Edited by G. D. Burrows, R. O. Stanley, P. B. Bloom
Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISBNs: 0-471-97009-3 (Hardback); 0-470-84640-2 (Electronic)
PART IV
Specific Disorders and Applications
7
International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis. Edited by G. D. Burrows, R. O. Stanley, P. B. Bloom
Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISBNs: 0-471-97009-3 (Hardback); 0-470-84640-2 (Electronic)
Hypnosis and Recovered Memory: Evidence-Based Practice
KEVIN M. McCONKEY
University of New South Wales, Australia
INTRODUCTION
Memories can be accurate, inaccurate, incomplete, and malleable. They are sometimes detailed and specific, and sometimes fragmentary and vague. People sometimes remember things they had forgotten, and sometimes create accounts of things that never happened. We know that memory is influenced by cognitive and social events and that influence can occur during encoding, storage, and retrieval. As Bartlett (1932/1995) argued: ‘Remembering is not the re-excitation of innumerable fixed, lifeless, and fragmentary traces. It is an imaginative reconstruction, or construction, built out of the relation of our attitude towards a whole active mass of organized past reactions or experience’ (p. 213).
Memories reported in the clinical setting are usually autobiographical in nature. That is, they usually involve events or experiences that have played a significant part in the life of the individual. If we are to understand such memories, then we have to consider the purposes, processes, and products of autobiographical remembering, and we have to embed that remembering within its biological, affective, interpersonal, sociocultural, and historical contexts (Bruner & Feldman, 1996; Hirst & Manier, 1996; Rubin, 1996). In other words, remembering past experiences is a pervasive part of life, and changes in an individual’s life can be associated with changes in remembering (Fivush, Haden & Reese, 1996; Neisser & Fivush, 1994). The critical place of memory in human experience is clear when we examine individual lives in their social context, and that point needs to be kept in mind when we consider the impact of hypnosis on memories reported in the clinical setting (McConkey, 1995).
Previous << 1 .. 46 47 48 49 50 51 < 52 > 53 54 55 56 57 58 .. 189 >> Next