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Elementary differential equations 7th edition - Boyce W.E

Boyce W.E Elementary differential equations 7th edition - Wiley publishing , 2001. - 1310 p.
ISBN 0-471-31999-6
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequat2001.pdf
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9. A certain college graduate borrows $8000 to buy a car. The lender charges interest at an annual rate of 10%. What monthly payment rate is required to pay off the loan in 3 years? Compare your result with that of Problem 9 in Section 2.3.
10. A homebuyer wishes to take out a mortgage of $100,000 for a 30-year period. What monthly payment is required if the interest rate is (a) 9%, (b) 10%, (c) 12%?
11. A homebuyer takes out a mortgage of $100,000 with an interest rate of 9%. What monthly payment is required to pay off the loan in 30 years? In 20 years? What is the total amount paid during the term of the loan in each of these cases?
12. If the interest rate on a 20-year mortgage is fixed at 10% and if a monthly payment of $1000 is the maximum that the buyer can afford, what is the maximum mortgage loan that can be made under these conditions?
13. A homebuyer wishes to finance the purchase with a $95,000 mortgage with a 20-year term. What is the maximum interest rate the buyer can afford, if the monthly payment is not to exceed $900?
The Logistic Difference Equation. Problems 14 through 19 deal with the difference equa-tion(21), un+1 = pun(1 — un).
14. Carry out the details in the linear stability analysis of the equilibrium solution un = (p — 1)/p; that is, derive the difference equation (26) in the text for the perturbation vn.
? 15. (a) For p = 3.2 plot or calculate the solution of the logistic equation (21) for several
initial conditions, say, u0 = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8. Observe that in each case the solution approaches a steady oscillation between the same two values. This illustrates that the long-term behavior of the solution is independent of the initial conditions.
(b) Make similar calculations and verify that the nature of the solution for large n is independent of the initial condition for other values of p, such as 2.6, 2.8, and 3.4.
16. Assume that p > 1 inEq. (21).
(a) Draw a qualitatively correct stairstep diagram and thereby show that if u0 < 0, then un ^ —? as n ^?.
(b) In a similar way determine what happens as n ^? if u0 > 1.
? 17. The solutions of Eq. (21) change from convergent sequences to periodic oscillations of
period two as the parameter p passes through the value 3. To see more clearly how this happens, carry out the following calculations.
(a) Plot or calculate the solution for p = 2.9, 2.95, and 2.99, respectively, using an initial value u0 of your choice in the interval (0, 1). In each case estimate how many iterations are required for the solution to get “very close” to the limiting value. Use any convenient interpretation of what “very close” means in the preceding sentence.
(b) Plot or calculate the solution for p = 3.01, 3.05, and 3.1, respectively, using the same initial condition as in part (a). In each case estimate how many iterations are needed to reach a steady-state oscillation. Also find or estimate the two values in the steady-state oscillation.
? 18. By calculating or plotting the solution of Eq. (21) for different values of p, estimate the
value of p for which the solution changes from an oscillation of period two to one of period four. In the same way estimate the value of p for which the solution changes from period four to period eight.
? 19. Let pk be the value of p for which the solution of Eq. (21) changes from period 2k— 1 to
period 2k. Thus, as noted in the text, p1 = 3,p2 = 3.449, and p3 = 3.544.
126
Chapter 2. First Order Differential Equations
PROBLEMS
(a) Using these values of p1, p2, and p3, or those you found in Problem 18, calculate
(p2 pi)/(p3 p2^-
(b) Let Sn = (pn _ pn_i)/(pn+i _ pn). It has been shown that Sn approaches a limit S as n ^ ?, where S = 4.6692 is known as the Feigenbaum number. Determine the percentage difference between the limiting value S and S2, as calculated in part (a).
(c) Assume that S3 = S and use this relation to estimate p4, the value of p at which solutions of period 16 appear.
(d) By plotting or calculating solutions near the value of p4 found in part (c), try to detect the appearance of a period 16 solution.
(e) Observe that
pn = p1 + (p2 _ p1) + (p3 _ p2) + + (pn _ pn—1).
Assuming that (p4 _ p3) = (p3 _ p2)S~l, (p5 _ p4) = (p3 _ p2)S_2, and so forth, express pn as a geometric sum. Then find the limit of pn as n ^ ?. This is an estimate of the value of p at which the onset of chaos occurs in the solution of the logistic equation (21).
Miscellaneous Problems One of the difficulties in solving first order equations is that there are several methods of solution, each of which can be used on a certain type of equation. It may take some time to become proficient in matching solution methods with equations. The following problems are presented so that you may have some practice in identifying the method or methods applicable to a given equation.
In each of Problems 1 through 32 solve the given differential equation. If an initial condition is given, also find the solution that satisfies it.
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