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Elementary differential equations 7th edition - Boyce W.E

Boyce W.E Elementary differential equations 7th edition - Wiley publishing , 2001. - 1310 p.
ISBN 0-471-31999-6
Download (direct link): elementarydifferentialequat2001.pdf
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Let us suppose that we have a self-adjoint boundary value problem for Eq. (41), where L [y] is given now by Eq. (43). We assume that p, q, r, and s are continuous on 0 < x < 1, and that the derivatives of p and q indicated in Eq. (43) are also continuous. If in addition p(x) > 0 and r (x) > 0 for 0 < x < 1, then there is an infinite sequence of real eigenvalues tending to +ro, the eigenfunctions are orthogonal with respect to the weight function r, and an arbitrary function can be expressed as a series of eigenfunctions. However, the eigenfunctions may not be simple in these more general problems.
We turn now to the relation between Sturm-Liouville problems and Fourier series. We have noted previously that Fourier sine and cosine series can be obtained by using the eigenfunctions of certain Sturm-Liouville problems involving the differential equation y" + ky = 0. This raises the question of whether we can obtain a full Fourier series, including both sine and cosine terms, by choosing a suitable set of boundary conditions. The answer is provided by the following example, which also serves to illustrate the occurrence of nonseparated boundary conditions.
Find the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the boundary value problem
EXAMPLE
4 y" + ky = 0, (44)
y(L) y( L) = 0, y ( L) y( L) = 0. (45)
This is not a Sturm-Liouville problem because the boundary conditions are not separated. The boundary conditions (45) are called periodic boundary conditions since they require that y and y assume the same values at x = L as at x =L. Nevertheless, it is straightforward to show that the problem (44), (45) is self-adjoint. A simple calculation establishes that k = 0 is an eigenvalue and that the corresponding eigenfunction is 00(x) = 1. Further, there are additional eigenvalues k = (n/L)2, = (2n/L)2,... ,kn = (nn/L)2,.... To each of these nonzero eigenvalues there correspond two linearly independent eigenfunctions; for example, corresponding to kn are the two eigenfunctions 0n(x) = cos(nnx/L) and ^ (x) = sin(nnx/L). This illustrates that the eigenvalues may not be simple when the boundary conditions are not separated. Further, if we seek to expand a given function f of period 2 L in a series of eigenfunctions of the problem (44), (45), we obtain the series
a0 / nn x nn x \
f (x) = y + 22 \an cos_T + bn sin_r),
n=1
which is just the Fourier series for f.
11.2 Sturm-Liouville Boundary Value Problems
639
PROBLEMS
We will not give further consideration to problems that have nonseparated boundary conditions, nor will we deal with problems of higher than second order, except in a few problems. There is, however, one other kind of generalization that we do wish to discuss. That is the case in which the coefficients p, q, and r in Eq. (1) do not quite satisfy the rather strict continuity and positivity requirements laid down at the beginning of this section. Such problems are called singular Sturm-Liouville problems, and are the subject of Section 11.4.
In each of Problems 1 through 5 determine the normalized eigenfunctions of the given problem.
7(0) = 0, /(1) = 0
/ (0) = 0, 7(1) = 0
7 (0) = 0, y (1) = 0
?(0) = 0, y(1) + y(1) = 0; see Section 11.1, Problem 8.
)y = 0, y(0) = 0, y(1) = 0; see Section 11.1, Problem 17.
TO
In each of Problems 6 through 9 find the eigenfunction expansion y an(x) of the given
n=1
function, using the normalized eigenfunctions of Problem 1.
1. / + y = 0,
2. / + y = 0,
3. / + y = 0,
4. y + y = 0,
5. y - 2 / + (1
6. f(x) = 1, 0 < x < 1 7. f(x) = x, 0 < x < 1
i, 0 < x < 2 I2x, 0 < x < 2
0, 2 < x < 2 9 f(x) = (l, 1 < x < 2
In each of Problems 10 through 13 find the eigenfunction expansion an<p (x) of the given
n=1
function, using the normalized eigenfunctions of Problem 4.
10. f(x) = 1, 0 < x < 1 11. f(x) = v, 0 < x < 1
{1 0 < x < 1
y 1 < 2
0, 2 < x < 1
In each of Problems 14 through 18 determine whether the given boundary value problem is self-adjoint.
14. y'+ y + 2y = 0, y(0) = 0, y(1) = 0
15. (1 + xV' + 2xy + y = 0, y(0) = 0, y(1) + 2/(1) = 0
16. y + y = ky, y(0) - y(1) = 0, y (0) - y(1) = 0
17. (1 + x2)y" + 2x/+ y = k(1 + x2)y, y(0) - y (1) = 0, /(0) + 2y(1) = 0
18. y' + ky = 0, y(0) = 0, y(n) + y(n) = 0
19. Show that if the functions u and v satisfy Eqs. (2), and either a2 = 0 or b2 = 0, or both, then
1
p(x)[u' (x)v(x) u(x)v'(x)] = 0.
0
20. In this problem we outline a proof of the first part of Theorem 11.2.3: that the eigenvalues of the Sturm-Liouville problem (1), (2) are simple. For a given k suppose that 01 and 02 are two linearly independent eigenfunctions. Compute the Wronskian W(<pv 02)(x) and use the boundary conditions (2) to show that W(01, 02)(0) = 0. Then use Theorems 3.3.2 and 3.3.3 to conclude that 01 and 02 cannot be linearly independent as assumed.
21. Consider the Sturm-Liouville problem
- [p(x)y\ + q (x)y = kr(x)y, a1 y(0) + a2 y (0) = 0, b1 y(1) + b2/(1) = 0,
640
Chapter 11. Boundary Value Problems and Sturm Liouville Theory
where p, q, and r satisfy the conditions stated in the text.
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