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Self help the menegment - Nelson B.

Nelson B. Self help the menegment - wiley publishing , 2005. - 304 p.
ISBN 0-471-70545-4
Download (direct link): selfhelpthemanagementbible2005.pdf
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• “You have been late to work every day this week.”
Step 2: Express the Impact to the Work Unit
An employee’s poor performance or misconduct doesn’t just negatively impact him or her, it also has a negative impact on the work unit and the organization as a whole. When an employee underperforms, for example, another employee may have to be assigned to pick up the work that isn’t getting done. This takes the other employee away from the
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work that he or she should be doing, ultimately having a negative impact on the organization’s bottom line.
Continuing with the examples that we started in the preceding section, here are the next steps in your discipline script:
• “Because of your below-standard performance, the work unit didn’t meet its overall targets for the month.”
• “This violation specifically breaks our drug-free workplace policy.”
• “Because of your tardiness, I had to pull Jim out of the mailroom to cover your job.”
Step 3: Specify the Required Changes
The next step is to explain to your employee exactly what he or she needs to do to correct the behavior. At this time, you will also tell the employee that his or her behavior must be in accordance with an established performance standard or company policy.
Here are some examples of the third part of your discipline script:
• “You must bring your performance up to the standard of 40 reports per month or better immediately.”
• “You will be required to set an appointment with the company’s employee assistance program for drug counseling.”
• “I expect you to be in your seat, ready to work, at 9:00 A.M. every morning.”
Step 4: Outline the Consequences
No discipline is complete without a discussion of the consequences if the unacceptable behavior continues. Make sure that your message is clear and that your employee understands it.
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The Management Bible
THE REAL WORLD
Although it's seldom the most desirable aspect of managing, discipline is a serious responsibility that no effective manager should shirk. Rarely does a bad situation automatically correct itself, and often things will get worse if left unchecked. By correcting employees quickly, objectively, and constructively, you have the opportunity to keep a small problem from becoming a major problem and can even make the experience a positive one from which the employee can learn, appreciate, and grow. To disarm your criticism, it is easy to use a disclaimer such as, "I may be wrong about this, but it seems as though your motivation has dropped of late. Is there something you'd like to discuss?" If the employee dismisses your concern, focus more specifically on your evidence that a problem exists: "I've been getting complaints about you from some of our customers." If nothing else, because the situation is a concern for you, it needs to be a concern for the employee. Like any skill, the more you practice discipline and giving corrective feedback, the better you become at it.
Here are some examples for the fourth part of your script:
• “If you can’t meet the standard, you’ll be reassigned to the training unit until your skills improve.”
• “If you refuse to undergo drug counseling, you’ll be suspended from work without pay for three days.”
• “If you’re late again, I will request that my boss give you a formal reprimand.”
Step 5: Provide Emotional Support
During the course of a discipline, your employee would benefit from
an emotional boost. Support your employee’s efforts to improve in a
sincere and heartfelt way.
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Here are some examples of how to wrap up your discipline script:
• “But I’m sure you’ll be able to avoid that—I know you can do better!”
• “We need you and our customers need you—let’s find you the help you need.”
• “But I’m sure we can avoid that situation—I’m counting on you to turn this around!”
Put It All Together
After you develop the five parts of your discipline script, put them together into a unified statement. This statement is what you’ll deliver to your employees in a discipline meeting. While you should discuss the surrounding issues in some detail, make your script be the heart of the discipline session.
• “You produced only 25 service reports last month instead of the required standard of 40 per month. Because of your below-standard performance, the work unit didn’t meet its overall targets for the month. You must bring your performance up to the standard of 40 reports per month or better immediately. If you can’t meet the standard, you’ll be reassigned to the training unit until your skills improve. But I’m sure you’ll be able to avoid that—I know you can do better!”
• “You failed the drug test that you took on Friday. This violation specifically breaks our drug-free workplace policy. You’ll be required to set an appointment with the company’s employee assistance program for drug counseling. If you refuse to undergo drug counseling, you’ll be suspended from work without pay for three days. We need you and our customers need you—let’s find you the help you need.”
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