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IT Portfolio management step by step - Maizlish B

Maizlish B, Handler R. IT Portfolio management step by step - John Wiley & Sons, 2005. - 401 p.
ISBN.: 978-0-471-64984-8
Download (direct link): itportfoliomanagement2005.pdf
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13. Richard N. Foster, “Corporate Performance and Technological Change through Investors’ Eyes,” Research-Technology Management, Nov.-Dec. 2003.
14. Steve Roesenbush and Cliff Edwards, “Corporate Spending: Signs of Life,” Business Week, July 14, 2003, p. 32.
15. R. Leifer, C. M. McDermott, G. C. Otonner, L. S. Peters, W. Veryzer, and M. Rice, Radical Innovation. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business Press, 2000.
16. Stevens and Burley, “3,000 Raw Ideas = 1 Commercial Success,” Research and Technology Management, May-June 1997.
17. Albert Johnson, “Industrial Research Institute’s R&D Trends Forecast for 2004,” Jan.-Feb. 2004.
18. www.compustat, October 2003.
19. Ian C. MacMillan and Rita Gunther McGrath, “Crafting R&D Project Portfolios,” Research-Technology Management, Sept.-Oct. 2002.
20. Caroline Grattinger, Suzanne Garcia, Jeannine Sivly, Robert Schenk, and Peter VanSyckle, “Using Technology Readiness Levels Scale to Support Technology Management in the DoD’s ATD/STO Environments,” Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, Sept. 2002.
21. Ibid.
22. Peter A. Koen, “Understanding the Front End: A Common Language and Structured Picture,” Stevens Institute of Technology, The Front End Innovation Conference, IIRUSA, 2004.
23. Ibid.
24. Ibid.
25. Robert G. Cooper, Winning at New Products, 3rd edition, Perseus Publishing, 2001.
26. Peter A. Koen, “Understanding the Front End: A Common Language and Structured Picture,” Stevens Institute ofTechnology, The Front End Innovation Conference, IIRUSA, 2004.
170 CHAPTER 4 IT PORTFOLIOS AND THEIR CONTENT IN CONTEXT
27. Robert G. Cooper, Winning at New Products, 3rd edition, Perseus Publishing, 2001.
28. Paul Belliveau, Abbie Griffen, and Stephen Somermeyer, The PDMA Toolbook for New Product Development, Chapter 1, John Wiley & Sons, April 2002.
29. Peter A. Koen, “Understanding the Front End: A Common Language and Structured Picture,” Stevens Institute of Technology, The Front End Innovation Conference, IIRUSA, 2004.
30. Paul Belliveau, Abbie Griffen, and Stephen Somermeyer, The PDMA Toolbook for New Product Development, Chapter 1, John Wiley & Sons, April 2002.
31. Ibid.
32. Richard E. Albright and Thomas A. Kappel, “Roadmapping in the Corporation,”
Research-Technology Management, Mar.—Apr. 2003.
33. Paul Belliveau, Abbie Griffen, and Stephen Somermeyer, The PDMA Toolbook for New Product Development, Chapter 1, John Wiley & Sons, April 2002.
34. Ibid.
35. Peter A. Koen, “Understanding the Front End: A Common Language and Structured Picture,” Stevens Institute of Technology, The Front End Innovation Conference, IIRUSA, 2004.
36. PMBOK 1996 edition. Project Management Body of Knowledge, Project Management Institute, 1996.
37. Robert G. Cooper, Scott J. Edgett, and Elko J. Kleinschmidt, “Optimizing the Stage-Gate Process: What Best-Practice Companies Do—II, Research-Technology Management, Nov.-Dec. 2002.
38. Edward F. McDonough, III and Francis Spital, “Managing Project Portfolios,” R-Technology Management, May-June 2003.
39. Ibid.
40. Adapted from Gina Colarelli O’Connor, Richard Hendricks, and Mark P. Rice, “Assessing Transition Readiness for Radical Innovation,” Research-Technology Management, Nov.-Dec. 2002.
APPENDIX 4a______________________
Technology Readiness Levels: Hardware and Software
Technology Readiness Level Description
1. Basic principles HW: Lowest level of technology readiness. Scientific
observed and reported research begins to be translated into applied research
and development. Examples might include paper studies
of a technology's basic properties.
SW: Lowest level of software readiness. Basic research
begins to be translated into applied research and
development. Examples might include a concept that
can be implemented in software or analytic studies of
an algorithm's basic properties.
2. Technology concept and/or HW/SW: Invention begins. Once basic principles are
application formulated observed, practical applications can be invented.
Applications are speculative and there may be no proof
or detailed analysis to support the assumptions.
Examples are limited to analytic studies.
3. Analytical and HW: Active research and development is initiated. This
experimental critical includes analytical studies and laboratory studies to
function and/or physically validate analytical predictions of separate
characteristic proof elements of the technology. Examples include compo-
of concept nonents that are not yet integrated or representative.
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