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IT Portfolio management step by step - Maizlish B

Maizlish B, Handler R. IT Portfolio management step by step - John Wiley & Sons, 2005. - 401 p.
ISBN.: 978-0-471-64984-8
Download (direct link): itportfoliomanagement2005.pdf
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Planning Execution
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E-Mail Warehouse
Management
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Portal/


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V'^J
Conferencing
Demand
Planning
Distrib.
Planning
Supply
Planning
Mfg.
Planning
Trans.
Planning
Strategic
Planning
Industry-
Specific
Solutions
Product
Mgmt.
Employee
Systems
Legacy
Systems
Service
Automation
Order
Mgmt.
Ln
Manu- Human . .
facturing Finance Resources Logistics
Marketing
Automation
Sales
Automation
Web/
Intranet
Fact. HH Employee
Devices Self-Service

Voice (IVR, ACD)
Conferencing ?
Web
Storefront
Mobile Sales (Prod. CFG)
Operational
Closed-Loop Processing (EAI Toolkits, ETLM Tools, Embedded Mobile Agents)
Direct
Interaction
Knowledge Management/ Content Management
Analytical
more details to the “application type” attribute to simplify the views, thus facilitating understanding and gaining consensus agreement. Applications can be aggregated into higher-level categories such as HR or finance. This diagram supports:
• Communication of what the application portfolio looks like and potential highlights of key issues/status (which applications need to be replaced or where gaps exist).
• Determining gaps by comparing a company’s application portfolio diagram to a best-practice application model (e.g., for the CRM domain, comparing the diagram to the CRM Technology Ecosystem). Gaps can then be graphically represented and prioritized.
• In-progress application projects.
• The complexity of integration, showing some or all of the interactions among applications.
A more esoteric use for this type of diagram is as a sanity check during business continuity planning. Typically, this includes prioritizing the order in which
IT ASSET PORTFOLIO
161
applications will be recovered during a disaster. Because it is unlikely that all applications will come back up at once, the company can use this diagram to highlight functionality that will not be available in an application because of dependencies on other applications that may be lower on the restoration priority list.
Overall business value ideally focuses on a standardized (or agreed-on) set of value statements or categories. The most basic value statements associated with applications are that they empower users to do something with information or they automate a business process (resulting in specific value statements such as reducing costs, cutting cycle times, or improving quality). Best-in-class companies have developed value categories as part of how value is created and have captured them in an overall value management process. It is important to note that some applications will deliver on more than one value statement. Ideally, all types of value associated with an application are created and rolled into an overall value rating. Common value categories include:
• Increasing revenues, potentially with subcategories such as reaching new customers/markets, selling new products, upselling
• Reducing costs
• Reducing cycle times—for example, shortening sales cycles, reducing time to market for new products, accelerating delivery of products or services to customers, or shortening order-to-sales cycles
• Migrating risk by enabling or improving regulatory compliance, business continuity, and security
User information can range from basic descriptions to key user groups and number of users to feedback from the users on how well the application enables them:
• User satisfaction: The level of user happiness with a particular application is simply a litmus test that is often overlooked.
• User competency: Many application issues actually stem from users not being properly trained rather than core issues with the application. Simple questions to ask for this attribute include:
• Does the application justify an investment in training?
• Did users go through any training on the application?
• How often do users go through a refresher or more advanced course?
User information attributes can lead to some interesting analysis:
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