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Piano for dummies - Neely B.

Neely B. Piano for dummies - IDG Books , 1991. - 353 p.
Download (direct link): pianofordummies1991.pdf
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Take a melody from this.

» ^
? m
\ m

Figure 15-8:
Romancing the tone
to this
~o~
228 Part V: Technique Counts for Everything
Try this new harmonic trick with the song “Go Tell Aunty Rhody You Love Her” (Track 93) and make it into a pop-style ballad. By the way, now would be an opportune time to use that dimmer switch I recommended earlier.
Track 93
Go Tell Aunty Rhody l/ou LoOe Her
22
Go
tell Aunt
Rho
dy.
m
9°——r—l
e?
tell Aunt
?
Am
p
Rho - dy,
go
tell Aunt
Rho
dy that
P
?
3E
you love her so
much.
And then ask
P
*
2?----------------
her for
mon
ey
e
Chapter 15: Perusing the Aisle of Style
Soul Searching
Talk about a broad category of music! Soul can incorporate anything from R&B (a hip abbreviation for “rhythm and blues”) to gospel to rap. Such soulful styles are made popular by artists like Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, and Otis Redding. And in my opinion, it’s great for dancing, although I don’t recommend sashaying too much while sitting at the piano.
Saring your soul
Danceable music requires danceable rhythms, so have the following rhythmic concepts in your repertoire before strutting over to the keys:
J1 Dotted eighth-sixteenth pattern: See Chapter 6.
,h Right-hand intervals: See Chapter 10.
J’ Syncopation: Again, see Chapter 6.
S Disco ball: Rent from your local party supply outlet.
Motoutn sounds
^S-CD
In the 1960s, Motown Records had a stable of artists specializing in the R&B sound. So popular were these artists that their style became known as the Motown sound But don’t think the 1960s are gone. You can add the Motown sound to any of your favorite songs.
Using a left-hand pattern with a syncopated rhythm, play Figure 15-9. Pretty soon you’ll be hearing The Temptations doo-wopping right along with you.
You can make “Home on the Range” (Track 94) sound like a Motown hit by playing a similar left-hand accompaniment pattern against the melody. A bit of advice, though: Take the song slowly at first and with each hand separately.
230 Part V: Technique Counts for Everything
*? m^m-
1 If s
m
©
IK
3=) J
m
m
m
m
. *
m
*%fCf
?
p:
Figure 15-9:
The
Motown
Sound
m
m—»
2L
Hip
10
Funky sounds going round
Soul and R&B styles often incorporate elements of funk. You know, like James Brown or George Clinton. Heavy syncopation coupled with dotted eighth-sixteenth rhythmic patterns provide the funky feel for this funky sound. Play Figure 15-10 with a little attitude.
Chapter 15: Perusing the Aisle of Style 231
h 'ome on tfn C m^rn P i Motoutn Rc - f '-- • H J : inge F __L. :: 1 p 1
Oh, *>: 4 > f: » 3 p= give me a |° ?? 3 =3=: home and a ”]r ? re - cor 1 d c on - m
^ A 1 F — m <9 ? - , • •— • * C r f iC: 1 m ^ m ~ 1 # « ^ c ' G7 C 1 * w 1 InW 9 " t m m
t <> act —r * and I'll make lots —|— of mon-ey, for you -j H =ff? r h, oh,
v' — 5 G7 =fl== Lf J c ?N r F 1 ^ (• ? =^= r;
ol 4>: h < 1 j d: 3 3=^ 1 prac - tee th J J 1 1 J J ?=^=3=3= e grooves that the n J I I i J3p __iL p au - d i - m ence
/ • 9 F m © 'j ^ 1 J J J C _ -*1 _ •« * • »—x G7 # J <9 ~ p ^ p j* C o
¹ w ants, * * * ^5 so you can send r ^ MJJj? > ; .—j— me on a tour 8 too.
b-=- J | jj/jj 1 1 «'
232 P»r«V: Technique Counts for Everything
Figure 15-10:
Check out the funk
>-
0:4 : • ij* 1 i w • 1 ?# 5 j J
/ 1 » 1 r^Nh m— a V+ P / >“
-e*-\ =$= • P •! • * #« i—m— i 3 —k F «r - -P
3 J«r, , — i ? «• . S i1 f=4 P m m ' =iH
— ? m a 1 J:
5 S t - =t a ^ « > *• f m. ? v ? m -a J m ~T / > A ?
O: 7 7 r*— 1 m 2 |a —3— < 7 r v—?— A -r—*—
"If i V ?b=L_, i—J L J-J-ttJ =*r=
<&tco
^ Take that attitude and those syncopations and add them to a favorite song iBnOr I ^or He’s a Jolly Good Fellow” (Track 95). Never did a children’s song
JJ sound so funky!
Chapter 15: Perusing the Aisle of Style 233
Track 95
For He's a Funky Good Fettou1

* k* ^ #? a • ?Vm f ft f ^ 9 1 W > 1 Fo ~ 7 m r —
m m\f
1
$
Si
P—VU P
he’s a funk - y good
tj
fel - low For
he is a funk - y good
P• J \>*
P
W
*
-7 7
P"
he's
P"
a funk - y
?7
good
fel - low, yes he is! For
fel - low .
k<
IP P^F- F pj [}'? 1 ^
No one can de - ny his funk - y

m
smell - ol
*1 J) *1 J) -------------------------------------
Part V: Technique Counts for Everything
Ad That Jazz
If there’s one particular music style that embraces unusual chords, it’s gotta be jazz. Celebrated by many as America’s greatest art form, jazz is king of interesting chord harmonies, changing rhythms, and improvisation. Legendary jazz pianists like Bill Evans, Art Tatum, Bud Powell, and many others have taken these elements and added them to classic songs to make them a little more jazzy. You, too, can do this after reading this section.
Jazzing it up
All of the legendary jazz pianists use tried-and-true musical tricks from time to time to freshen things up. Borrow these tricks yourself:
S Chord substitutions: See the “Substituting chords” section later in this chapter.
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