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Piano for dummies - Neely B.

Neely B. Piano for dummies - IDG Books , 1991. - 353 p.
Download (direct link): pianofordummies1991.pdf
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Try the same song, now written in the key of D, which you can hear on Track 50. Notice the key signature and remember to play Fs as F-sharp and Cs as C-sharp. Have fun and good luck!
U 6 Part IV: Living in Perfect Harmony
Track 50
Worried Mart Blues (in the keif of ?)
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14
Finding kegs the E~Z Wag
A key signature tells you instantly which key the song is in. You may be thinking, “Well, if I have to count all the sharps or flats and then figure out which scale they’re in, that’s not going to be very instantaneous!” Think
Chapter 11: Understanding Keys U7
again. You don’t have to do anything of the sort. Without counting, without playing — without even thinking about it really — you can simply glance at the key signature and know immediately which key the song is in.
Key signatures With sharps
To read a key signature that contains sharps, follow these steps:
1. Locate the last sharp (farthest to the right) on either the treble or bass clef.
2. Move up one half-step to find the name of the key the song is played in.
For example, if you have two sharps, F-sharp and C-sharp, the last one is C-sharp. Up a half-step from C-sharp is D. The song is in the key of D.
Figure 11-5 shows you key signatures for all sharp keys. See how quickly you can name the key for each of these.
Note that keys with lots of sharps use a slight bit of brain power. For example, on your piano keyboard the key one half-step up from E is F. This is also (technically) called E-sharp. So, if the sixth sharp in the key signature is E-sharp (which is the same as F-natural), you raise it one half-step to determine the correct key, which is F-sharp.
Key signatures u>ith fiats
To read a key signature that contains flats, just locate the next-to-the-last flat (second from the right) in the key signature. That’s the name of the key you’re in. For example, if you have three flats in a key signature — B-flat, E-flat, and A-flat — the next to the last one is E-flat. The song is in the key of E-flat. Figure 11-6 shows all of the flat keys.
Part IV: Living in Perfect Harmony
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There is one key that has a signature you must memorize — the key of F. Because it has only one flat (B-flat), there is no such thing as a “next-to-the-last” flat for you to read. So, you must remember that one flat in the key signature means that a song is in the key of F. 1 have no easy way for you to remember this, and I am terribly sorry.
Whoops! Taking back the keg signature
Occasionally a composer adds some variety to a song by throwing in a note from outside the key, such as an F-natural in the key of G. These notes from outside the key are called accidentals.
Figure 11-7:
Not all Fs are sharp.
Personally, the term accidental makes me laugh. If the note is really an accident, the composer would surely have corrected it by now. In any case, the note indicated is the correct note (not an accident) and you should play it as it’s written.
Composers use a natural sign, shown in measures 1 and 3 of Figure 11-7, to indicate when you should play a note from outside the key. For example, in the key of G, all Fs are F-sharp. So, if a composer “accidentally” wants you to play F-natural, you see a natural sign next to the F. The natural sign overrules the sharp in the key signature, but only for one measure or until you see another F-sharp, whichever comes first.
F-sharp \
F-sharp again
Still F-natural \
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t
Natural sign
Many songs use accidentals to add freshness to the melody. If you’ve ever seen a baseball game, an Olympic gold medal ceremony, or a station sign-off on TV, you know “The Star-Spangled Banner” (Track 51). But you probably don’t know that the melody contains several accidentals. Do you know that the composer is Francis Scott Key? How appropriate.
Chapter 11: Understanding Keys 169
Track 51
The Star-Spangled Banner
Oh, — say can you see by the dawn's ear - ly light, what so
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proud - ly we hailed at the twi - light's last gleam - ing, whose broad
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stripes and bright stars through the per - i - lous fight o'er the
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ram - parts we watched were so gal - ant - ly stream- ing. And the
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rock - ets red glare, the bomb's burst - ing in air, gave
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proof through the night that our
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there.
Oh,
erPPlJ J J-f- m m • m m m -J—
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say does that— star - span - gled ban - ner— yet— wave— o'er the
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