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Fraud Exprosed Whot you Dont Could Cost your company millions - Joseph W.

Joseph W. Fraud Exprosed Whot you Dont Could Cost your company millions - Wiley Publishing, 2003. - 289 p.
ISBN: 0-471-27475-5
Download (direct link): fraudexposedwhatyoudont2003.pdf
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Bayesian statistics, 159
Bratton, William:
benefits of outside expertise, 233 Bust Bus, 145-148 expectations of officers, 11 lies by police, 15 NYPD organization, 10-11 reasons for crime reduction, 30-31 subway crime, 9-10 traditional law enforcement, 6-7
Broken windows theory, 22-23, 25-26,
145
Fixing Broken Windows, 22 Burns, Stephen :
actions taken, 131-132 codes of ethics, 126 Business ethics survey, 42
California Public Interest Research Group, 50
Campbell, George:
building effective units, 119-121 indicators of program success,
182-183,185 use of advertising, 184
Canada, fraud rates, 43-44 Carpenter, Brian W. and Daniel P. Mahoney: ethics programs, 106 fraud funding, 222 internal controls, 103 on ethics programs, 106 need for active measures, 186-187 Chief Security Officers, 210-211 Codes of conduct, 123
compliance officer, role, 132
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations, 127-129
INDEX
Community:
characteristics of, 135-138 sense of, 95-96 Community Policing, 18-22 growth of, 31 development of, 179-180 leadership in, 216-218 Co-opetition, 174-175
Compstat, 26-27
use as organizational sensor, 190-192 Computer crime, 48-50 Computer Security Institute, 39, 40, 48, 82 Controls, steps to improve, 218-220 Corporate crime: definition of, xvi size of, 33 Corporate integrity agreements, 124
Cressey, Donald R., 43 fraud theories, 52-53 Crime:
causes of, 3-4 cost of, 16 excuses for, 24-25 fraud losses, 33-40 gangs, 4-5 public fear of, 6 rates, 1-6
root cause theory, 23-25 Delattre, Edwin J.:
noble cause corruption, 15, 178 slippery slope, 110-112 Discretionary law enforcement, 190 Downsizing, 56 Dynamic conservatism, 89-90 Edelman, Murray:
organizational realities, 90-91 use of language, 13-14
Employees:
definition of, 78 education of, 118 Ernst & Young LLP:
Canadian fraud survey, 43-44
Global Information Security Survey— 2002, 166 The Unmanaged Risk: An International Survey of the Effect of Fraud on Business, 37, 87, 139, 166-167
Espionage, 81-82
Ethical codes, 113, 125, 131
Ethics Officers Association (EOA), 126-127, 195
FBI:
Computer Crime and Security Survey
(1999), 39-40
Computer Crime and Security Survey
(2000), 48, 82-83 National Incident-Based Reporting
System (NIBRS), 80, 193-194 profiling, 157-158 Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCRP), 40, 80, 192-193
Federal Sentencing Guidelines, 125, 129-130
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, 128-129
Fraud Identification Codes, 195
Funding:
SEC lack of, 223 sources, 223-228
Game theory, 171-174
GartnerG2, 48-49
Geis, Gil, 234-235
Gottfredson, Michael R. and Travis Hirschi: criticism of theory, 65-74 general theory of crime, 57-65
Goldstein, Herman:
community policing, 19-22 Herman Goldstein Awards, 28-29
Hallcrest Report II, 33
Health and Human Services, program fraud, 35
Hollinger, Richard C. and John P. Clark: fraud causation theory, 54-55 new employees, 138 organizational intelligence, 100-101
Hotlines, 101, 115
INDEX
Identity theft, 50
Independent Private Sector Inspector General (IPSIG), 124
Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA): Business Fraud Survey, 37, 106 computer fraud survey, 46-47 definition of employees, 78 plans for development, xiv new Standards promulgated, 213 turnover in audit staff, 108
Institute of Management and Administration:
Business Fraud Survey, 37 computer fraud survey, 46-47 Insurance:
for fraud losses, 87 limits of, 213-214 Intellectual property, 79-80
Internal audit function: fraud resources, 222 indications of weakness, 185 measures to improve, 186 relations with audit committee, 187 role in the future, 209 turnover in, 108
Jacobs, Jane, 22 Kelling, George:
basis for theories, 25 broken windows theory, 22-23, 28 case processing, 12 need for continuity, 102 police executive turnover, 26 Kelly, Raymond W., 156
KPMG, 1998 Fraud Survey, 37, 56-57, 104-105, 116-117, 233
Law Enforcement News, 18, 32, 155
Meliorists, theories of, 24
Nash, John, 171-173
National Counterintelligence Executive, 82
National Fraud Center, 81
National Public Survey on White Collar Crime, 35-37
National Retail Security Survey, 39
National White Collar Crime Center (NWCCC), 35-37, 99
National White Collar Crime Complaint Center, 48
Neuroscience, 167-169
Occupational fraud:
ability of insurance to cover, 87 and general theory of crime, 57-65 causes, 52-55
characteristics of, 34-37, 45-46
cost of, xv, 33-40
definition of, xvi, 76
definition of employees, 78
effective controls, 47
funding of research in, 98-99
found by Inspectors General, 50-51
in military, 93-94
reporting rates, 99
role of volunteers, 78-79
where found, xv
Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA), 227-228
Organizations:
ethics in, 230-231
executive ethics in, 237-238
profiling of, 164-167
reluctance to report crimes, 196-198
reluctance to spend money, 222
Pinkerton—Top Security Threats and
Management Issues Facing Corporate America, 37, 108
Police Executive Research Forum, 28, 233
Police:
as case processors, 12-13 characteristics of, 8-9 clearance rates, 192 community policing, 19-22, 31 cost of, 16, 29-30 crime reduction, 30-31 development in the United States, 1 discretion, 17-18 executive turnover, 26 gratuities, 111-112 inner life of, 201
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