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Fraud Exprosed Whot you Dont Could Cost your company millions - Joseph W.

Joseph W. Fraud Exprosed Whot you Dont Could Cost your company millions - Wiley Publishing, 2003. - 289 p.
ISBN: 0-471-27475-5
Download (direct link): fraudexposedwhatyoudont2003.pdf
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5. 221 F.3d 329 (2d Cir. 2000), cert denied, 122 S.Ct.44 (2001), cited in Elliot B. Spector,
“Stopping Suspects Based On Racial And Ethnic Descriptions,” The Police Chief (January
2002), p.10. The Police Chief is published by The International Association of Chiefs of
Police, Inc.
6. See note 3, 8.
7. Id.
8. Id.
9. Id.
10. Id. , 9.
11. Conversations with Carson Dunbar, April 9-10, 2002.
12. See note 3, 10.
13. Id.
14. Id.
15. Id. , 8.
16. “Prof. George Kelling, co-author of ‘Fixing Broken Windows’,” interview by Marie Simonetti Rosen, Law Enforcement News 25, no. 511, 512, (May 15 and 31, 1999), 8. Reprinted with permission of Law Enforcement News (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York:
1999).
17. Id.
18. Lardner and Repetto, NYPD: A City and Its Police, 295.
19. See note 16. For a critique of the effectiveness of “broken windows” theories and applications, see “The Broken-Windows Myth,” by Bernard E. Harcourt, The New York Times (September
11, 2001), A-23. Harcourt notes, among other observations, that increased levels of enforcement in New York City have produced a 66 percent jump in misdemeanor arrests and “sharp increases in stop-and-frisks that allow more searches for guns, more checks
ENDNOTES
for outstanding warrants, and more fingerprint collection.” He observes, however: “This enhanced surveillance has come with a big price tag: a 37 percent increase in complaints of police misconduct from 1993 to 1999, significant racial disparities in enforcement, illegal strip searches, and many traumatic encounters”
20. See note 16.
21. Id. The “root causes” philosophy is not found solely in law enforcement. Writing about the U.S. and international military response to the events of September 11, 2001, author Victor David Hanson has noted that many tend to believe war itself emanates from concrete injustices, ignorance, or insanity, rather than mere evil. See Victor Davis Hanson, “The Longest War,” American Heritage (February/March 2002), 45.
22. See note 2.
23. Malcolm Gladwell, “Why Some People Turn into Violent Criminals,” in Reichel, Selected Readings in Criminal Justice, 33-46.
24. Sarah Glazer, “Does Better Policing Reduce Crime?,” in Reichel, Selected Readings in Criminal Justice, 94-96.
25. Philip Terzian, “Idle, Addicted, Violent... and Self-Pitying” (review of Life at the Bottom, by Theodore Dalrymple), The Wall Street Journal (February 21, 2002) A-16.
26. Russell Kirk, “Criminal Character and Mercy,” from the book Criminal Justice Reform: A Blueprint by Randall R. Rader and Patrick B. McGuigan, 219. Copyright 1983 by Henry Regnery Publishing. All rights reserved. Reprinted by special permission of Regnery Publishing, Inc. Washington, D.C.
27. William A. Stanmeyer, “Making Criminal Justice Work,” from the book Criminal Justice Reform: A Blueprint by Randall R. Rader and Patrick B. McGuigan, 239. Copyright 1983 by Henry Regnery Publishing. All rights reserved. Reprinted by special permission of Regnery Publishing, Inc. Washington, D.C.
28. Robert J. Kelly, “Crime Causation from the Inmates’ Standpoint,” in Reichel, Selected Readings in Criminal Justice, 47-52.
29. See note 16.
30. A classic, and oft-cited, example of this secondary effect of enforcement of public-order crimes affecting the rate of more serious crimes was seen in the New York City subways. When fare-beaters were targeted the number of concealed weapons arrests rose sharply, thus lowering the rate of more serious crimes on the subway, a chronic problem for many years. See note 16, 10.
31. Neil Barsky, “From Triple-X to Just Extraordinary” (book review of Times Square Roulette, by Lynne B. Sagalyn), The Wall Street Journal, (February 20, 2002) A-20.
32. See note 16.
33. See note 16, 6. Again, with regard to the painful issue of making hard social choices, such as incarcerating people for relatively minor offenses, Hanson (see note 21, 46), is instructive. He notes, with regard to the military actions against bin Laden and other terrorists: “Real morality does not permit hesitating out of fear of injuring the innocent or suffering casualties.... Lincoln called such sacrifices ‘the terrible arithmetic’... (and) which Thucydides called the ‘harsh schoolmaster’.”
34. See note 16, 10.
35. Peter C. Dodenhoff, “LEN Salutes Its 1996 People of the Year, the NYPD and Its Compstat Process,” Law Enforcement News 22, no. 458, 1, 4. Reprinted with permission of Law Enforcement News (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York: 1996).
ENDNOTES
36. Id., 4.
37. Id.
38. William K. Rashbaum, “Crime-Fighting by Computer: Scope Widens,” The New York Times (March 24, 2002), 43.
39. Andy Newman, ”Crime Shows Biggest Drop in Five Years,” The New York Times (January 1, 2002), B-1.
40. Vincent E. Henry, The COMPSTAT Paradigm: Management Accountability in Policing, Business and the Public Sector (Flushing, NY: Looseleaf Law Publications, Inc., 2002), 245-248.
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