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MCSE Windows XP Professional For Dummies - Weadock G.

Weadock G. MCSE Windows XP Professional For Dummies - Hungry Minds , 2002. - 169 p.
ISBN:0764516310
Download (direct link): windowsxpprofesfordu2002.doc
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Warning Method #1 doesn't work if you have a domain PC: When you click the Add button on the Users tab of the User Accounts control panel, Windows XP prompts you to add a pre-existing domain user. I told you Microsoft doesn't want you adding local accounts to a domain PC!
Lab 10-1 goes through the steps for using Method #2.
Lab 10-1: Creating a Local User Account
1. Right-click My Computer (either on the Start menu or on the desktop) and choose Manage.
2. Expand the Local Users and Groups node in the tree pane (to the left) by clicking the + sign next to it.
3. Click the Users icon in the tree pane.
4. Right-click any blank space in the details pane (to the right) and choose New User (see Figure 10-2).

Figure 10-2: The management console's Local Users and Groups snap-in.
5. Fill in the requested data fields in the New User dialog box (see Figure 10-3).

Figure 10-3: Creating a new local user is easy.
* You can specify that the user must change the password at the next logon, placing the user in charge of his or her own password. If you don't specify this, then you can tell Windows that the user may never change the password, and/or that the password never expires.
* Finally, you can disable the account for the time being - for example, if you're setting it up in advance of hiring a new employee, or if you're about to delete an account and you want to verify first that no ill effects will occur.

Windows NT 4.0 users, note that the Local Users and Groups snap-in is the successor to NT's User Manager utility.
 Tip  Here are some tips on creating new local user accounts:
* User names must be unique among other user names on the machine and among other user names on the domain (if the PC belongs to a domain) or on the workgroup (if the PC belongs to a workgroup).
* Windows only cares about the first 20 characters of the user name.
* You can't use the special characters = + [ ] \ | / ; : < > or ?.
* The full name and description fields are optional.
* Passwords can't be longer than 127 characters, and Microsoft recommends they not be shorter than 8.
* Passwords can't use the special characters that are forbidden for user names (see third bullet point).
Fast account switching
A handy feature of Windows XP is the ability to switch to a different user account without having to log off the current account. The procedure is to choose Start?Log Off, and then click Switch User. You can have multiple programs and data files open for each logged-on user. Note that this new feature is not available on computers that belong to a domain, only to those that belong to a workgroup or that are standalone workstations.
You can disable or enable fast account switching via the User Accounts control panel's Use Fast User Switching check box.
Deleting user accounts
Lab 10-2 goes through the simple procedure for deleting a user account through the Users and Groups management console snap-in.
Lab 10-2: Deleting a Local User Account
1. Right-click My Computer and choose Manage.
2. Expand the Local Users and Groups node in the tree pane (to the left) by clicking the + sign next to it.
3. Click the Users icon in the tree pane.
4. Right-click the user's icon in the details pane (to the right) and choose Delete.
5. Read the warning message and click the Yes button.
The warning message you see reminds you that if you delete a user account, you permanently and irretrievably delete the Security ID (SID) associated with that account, as well as all its various access tokens conveying permissions to shared files, folders, printers, and so on. Which point leads me to an Instant Answer, as follows.

 Instant Answer  If an employee leaves your organization and you replace him with someone new, and you want the new person to have the same access privileges as the old person, don't delete the old employee's account. Right-click its icon in the Local Users and Groups snap-in and choose Rename to give the account a new name. Then, right-click it again and choose Set Password to give it a new password.
FYI, unique SIDs exist for groups and computers as well as for individual users.
Configuring user accounts
Two aspects of configuring user accounts are likely to receive mention on the test: account policy and group membership.
Sorry, it's company policy
If you ask most Microsoft network administrators to identify the most complex and confusing security feature of Windows operating systems, I'll bet a nickel that most of them respond with a single word: policies. From system policies in Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 9x to group policy, account policy, security policy, and so on ad nauseam in Windows XP, it takes a combination of dogged determination and hundreds of hours playing around with real live networks to fully grasp how Windows policies really work.
Thankfully, you don't have to achieve total policy enlightenment. Partial enlightenment serves you just fine. This section aims to illuminate a small subset of the entire policy population: account policies. As you may have guessed, account policies apply to user accounts, which is why I'm talking about them in this chapter.
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