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A raference for the rest of us - Scott J.

Scott J. A raference for the rest of us - Wiley publishing , 2003. - 387 p.
ISBN: 0-7645-1698-1
Download (direct link): microsoftcrmford2003.pdf
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All completed Activities, including the sent e-mail, appear in the main display. You can click the e-mail to open and read it and, if desired, print, forward, or reply to it.
Chapter 26: Imitating Outlook 313
Creating an Appointment
Figure 26-7:
Scheduling an Appointment in Outlook while linking it to a CRM record.
Scheduling an Appointment in Outlook and linking it to Microsoft CRM has some advantages:
You work in the familiar Outlook workspace.
The Appointment can be easily linked to a specific Record type in Microsoft CRM.
You can use Outlook’s Scheduling tab to see if the Appointment conveniently fits into the existing calendar of the attendees.
Follow these steps to create an Appointment in Outlook and link it to Microsoft CRM:
1. Click the CRM Appointment button in the Microsoft CRM toolbar (refer to Figure 26-1).
The Untitled — CRM Appointment window appears.
2. Fill in Subject, Location, Start and End Times; and then set the Alarm by checking the Reminder box and selecting the amount of lead time for the Alarm.
3. Click the Microsoft CRM tab near the top of the Untitled — CRM Appointment window.
A new view of the Untitled — CRM Appointment window appears with a prominent button called Regarding.
4. Click the Regarding button.
The Lookup window appears. (Figure 26-7 shows parts of both the CRM Appointment window and the Lookup window.)
314 Part VI: Appendixes
5. From the Type drop-down list, select the type to which you’d like to link the Appointment and click Go.
A list of available options (such as Account, Contact, and Opportunity) appears.
6. Select the Record type to which you’d like to link the Appointment and click OK.
The Appointment is now linked to the appropriate record in Microsoft CRM, and it appears on your CRM Calendar, in the appropriate activity list in CRM, and on your Outlook calendar.
7. Click Save and Close.
Creating a Task
Follow these steps to create a Task in Outlook and link it to Microsoft CRM:
1. Click the CRM Task button in the Microsoft CRM toolbar (refer to Figure 26-1).
The Untitled — CRM Task window appears.
2. Fill in Subject, Due Date, Start Date, Status and Priority; and then set the Alarm by checking the Reminder box and selecting the amount of lead time for the Alarm.
3. Click the Microsoft CRM tab near the top of the Untitled — CRM Task window.
A new view of the Untitled — CRM Appointment window appears with a prominent button called Regarding.
4. Click the Regarding button.
The Lookup window appears. (Figure 26-8 shows parts of both the CRM Task window and the Lookup window.)
5. Select the Record Type to which you’d like to link to the Task and click Go.
A list of available options (such as Lead, Quote, and Order) appears.
6. Select the Record type to which you’d like to link the Task and click OK.
The Task is now linked to the appropriate Record in Microsoft CRM, and it appears on your Outlook Task list and in the appropriate Activity list in Microsoft CRM.
7. Click Save and Close.
Chapter 26: Imitating Outlook S1B
Figure 26-8:
Scheduling a Task in Outlook and linking it to CRM.
ANG/ you must use the Microsoft CRM toolbar, the CRM shortcuts, or the Microsoft CRM View Pane to create Activities that can be linked to Microsoft CRM. If you use the normal Outlook buttons and menus to create these Activities, they will not appear in Microsoft CRM.
Deleting Records
Deleting anything makes me nervous, especially if the reason for deletion is to conserve hard drive space. Hard drives are huge and inexpensive, and data (like names, addresses, and e-mail addresses) are tiny. That said, there are times when data should be removed. If an Account has gone out of business, it’s probably a good idea to remove the Contact information. If the Contact hasn’t purchased anything in the two years you’ve been pursuing her business, maybe it’s a good idea to delete the Record.
On the other hand, maybe there’s gold in them there hills. If a company has gone out of business, the people have probably moved on to a new company; so, rather than deleting Account and Contact information, how about making some phone calls and updating the information to reflect the change? You can create new Accounts and copy and paste Contact information into them. You may meet new prospects along the way and introduce your Products to new markets.
And that deadbeat; can you learn from your history with her and use that information to improve your Sales tactics with the next tough sell?
My point here is this: You can easily delete information from a database, but make sure that the information is completely useless before you remove it.
316 Part VI: Appendixes
Deleting from Outlook
The result of deleting a Record in Outlook — a Record that’s linked to Microsoft CRM, that is — depends on the Record type. Keep these factors in mind when deleting Records:
Deleting an e-mail message in Outlook doesn’t delete that e-mail message in Microsoft CRM.
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