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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration - NCR

NCR Teradata RDBMS Database Administration - NCR , 2004. - 616 p.
Download (direct link): teradatadatabaseadmin2004.pdf
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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration 1 - 3 Chapter 1: Database Hierarchy

The Initial Teradata Database

Other Databases/Users

The following users and databases are created during the Teradata RDBMS installation process (at System Initialization (Sysinit) or database initialization time). If necessary, they are recreated each time Teradata RDBMS restarts.

To install an optional user or database that is created by running a DIP script, use the DIP Utility. For instructions, see "Database Initialization Program" in Teradata RDBMS Utilities.

Note: As of V2R5.0.0, Teradata no longer creates a default QCD database. If you use the Query Capture Feature (QCF), the DUMP EXPLAIN and INSERT EXPLAIN statements require you to specify a QCD name. You should examine all your QCD applications and convert those that are no longer compatible with the QCD schema. (For more details, see "Query Capture Facility (QCF)" on page 13-4 and "Query Capture Facility" in Teradata RDBMS SQL Reference, Volume 2.)

System Database/User Description For more information, see ...
ALL Internal username; used by the database system software. Defined with no PERM space.
CRASHDUMPS (defined to the Data Dictionary when DIPVIEWS is run during DIP phase of installation, migration, or upgrade) System user that provides, by default on UNIX, temporary storage of dumps generated by the PDE software. The default is 1 GB of PERM space. You may need to enlarge the permanent space, based on the size of your configuration, to accommodate at least three dumps. "About System User DBC.Crashdumps" on page 10-11
DEFAULT Internal username; used by the database system software. Defined with no PERM space.
PUBLIC Internal username; used by the database system software. Defined with no PERM space.

Teradata RDBMS Database Administration

1 - 3 Chapter 1: Database Hierarchy

The Initial Teradata Database

System Database/User Description For more information, see .
Sys_Calendar (defined to the Data Dictionary when DIPCAL script is run during DIP phase of installation, migration, or upgrade) System database used to contain the following objects, also created by DIPCAL: Sys_Calendar.CalDates system table Sys_Calendar.Calendar system view The Calendar view is a user-accessible tool for date arithmetic. "OLAP Calendar" under "Tracking Miscellaneous System Actions" in Teradata RDBMS Data Dictionary "Date Time and Interval Data Types" in Teradata RDBMS SQL Reference, Volume 3 "Ordered Analytical Functions" in Teradata RDBMS SQL Reference Volume 5
TDPUSER Internal username; used by Teradata RDBMS to support two-phase commit (2PC) transaction protocol. "2-Phase Commit (2PC) Protocol" on page 7-17 Teradata Director Program Reference

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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration 1 - 3 Chapter 1: Database Hierarchy

Administrative User

Administrative User

Before you define users and databases, you should first use the CREATE USER statement to create an administrative user to complete these tasks.

The amount of space for the administrative user is allocated from DBC's current PERM space. For more information on Perm space, see "Defining Permanent Space Limits" on page 3-2.

DBC becomes the owner of your administrative user and of all users and databases you subsequently create. Be sure to leave enough space in DBC to accommodate the growth of system tables and logs, and the transient journal.

You can name the user anything you would like. We have called the user DBAdmin.

When logged on as user DBC, the highest parent in the hierarchy, you should create a special administrative user (for example, DBAdmin) and assign to it as much DBC space as is available, after you calculate how much DBC needs for:

Your maximum-sized Transient Journal (see "Determining Maximum TJ Size" on page 7-30)

Growth of your DBC.AccessRights system table (see "Access Privileges" on page 6-2)

If you plan to implement Database Query Logging (DBQL), the maximum size of your DBC.DBQLogTbl, based on your planned table maintenance (see "Purging the System Logs" on page 4-16 and "The DBQL Logging Fields and Values" on page 14-7)

Growth of your DBC.Acctg system table, based on your planned table maintenance (see "Clearing DBC.Acctg Table with DBC.AMPUsage View" on page 4-15)

If you plan to use security access logging, the growth of your logs based on how many users, actions, and objects you track (see Teradata RDBMS Security Administration Manual)

Then log on as user DBAdmin to create all your Teradata RDBMS users and high-level databases. This ensures that DBAdmin will be the owner of each user and high-level database (and thus each will be a child of DBAdmin) and also of the objects created in them.

NCR also recommended that you log on as user DBAdmin to perform normal daily administrative tasks, in order to protect sensitive data and the system objects owned by DBC. In addition, change and then be sure to secure the DBC password.
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