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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration - NCR

NCR Teradata RDBMS Database Administration - NCR , 2004. - 616 p.
Download (direct link): teradatadatabaseadmin2004.pdf
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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration

11 - 3 Chapter 11: Handling System Dumps

Forcing System Dumps

Option

Comment

Dump Warning Interval

A Dump Warning Interval in the crontab file defines how often a message appears on the console reminding the operator that there is an unsaved, uncleared dump in the dump area. The default is every 60 minutes.

To change the interval, edit the crontab file for root to set the desired interval for the /etc/init.d/DUMPCHK file. You may want to change this interval:

Interval Description
0 Prevent this message from appearing at all.
120 Prevent the message from appearing when you make PDE crashdumps. If you save the PDE crashdumps soon after they occur, the 120-minute interval should be long enough to keep the message from appearing.

Forcing UNIX System Dumps

To force a UNIX System dump:

Step Action
1 Check the status of the dump area (impossible if the system is hung).
2 Clear the dump area (impossible if the system is hung).
3 Locate the DUMP toggle switch on the node. The toggle switch is in a different location depending on the system (for example, on a 5100 it is above the MCA card cage, on a 3500 it is on the back panel labeled DUMP). Refer to your NCR hardware manual for the exact location of the node DUMP toggle switch on your system. You can also force a dump from the AWS menus. For more information, refer to the AWS on UNIX User Guide.
4 Depress the toggle once. (To cancel the dump, press the toggle switch again.) The system reboots, and a UNIX system dump occurs.

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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration 11 - 3 Chapter 11: Handling System Dumps

Forcing System Dumps

Copying UNIX System Dumps to Media

NCR recommends that you save any existing UNIX system dumps before installing new software that requires a kernel rebuild.

For instructions on uploading UNIX dumps via the Web, see Knowledge Article S1100095972. (For instructions on how to access Knowledge Articles, see "Accessing NCR Knowledge Articles for Instructions" on page 10-26.)

To save a system dump to a tape in the tape drive on the node:

Step Action
1 Load the blank tape into the node tape drive. If you are using cartridge tape, you probably will need more than one cartridge to hold the dump.
2 To save the dump to the tape, enter a command similar to the following: # /sbin/dumpsave -d /dev/rmt/c100t0d0s0
3 The dumpsave command prompts you to enter the name of the kernel/executable file to save with the dump. The default is / unix, which is usually correct. If you have only one tape, you can specify the default by pressing the Enter key. Caution: If you are using multiple cartridge tapes, DO NOT PRESS Enter during the save. Also, be aware that the default is incorrect in the following cases:
IF . THEN .
You just built a new kernel on this node since the dump was taken Or, if: - The node was rebooted with the new kernel just once since the dump was taken - The node was rebooted with the new kernel more than once since the dump was taken enter the name of the kernel that was running when the dump was taken.
the old kernel is saved in /stand/unix.old.
the old kernel is gone and the dump is unusable.
4 Remove the tape when the save completes. With multiple cartridges, you are prompted to load another cartridge and told when the save is complete.

Teradata RDBMS Database Administration

11 - 3 Chapter 11: Handling System Dumps

Forcing System Dumps

Viewing UNIX System Dump Information

You can view UNIX System dumps in the dump area using the UNIX crash utility. To view UNIX System dumps:

Step Action
1 List the dump devices with the command:
# /usr/sbin/fdump -l
Results look similar to the following:
pathdev dumplo blocks
/dev/dsk/c10t0d0s635,65542 0 1048576
/dev/dsk/c120t0d0s635,655366 0 1048576
2 Use the dump device names in the CRASH command to access the dumps. For example: # crash -d /dev/dsk/c10t0d0s6,/dev/dsk/c120t0d0s6 Results look similar to the following: /dev/dsk/c10t0d0s6,/dev/dsk/c12 0t0d0s6 dumpfile(s) = /dev/dsk/c10t0d0s6(20000000) /dev/dsk/c120t0d0s6(20000000) namelist = /stand/unix, outfile = stdout 0>

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Teradata RDBMS Database Administration 11 - 3 Chapter 11: Handling System Dumps

Handling Windows 2000 System Dumps

Handling Windows 2000 System Dumps

When the Windows 2000 stops, it displays a bright blue screen with crash messages. Windows 2000 immediately copies all of node memory into %root%MEMORY.DMP. The default path is:

C:\WINNT\MEMORY.DMP

Windows 2000 also creates entries in the Windows Application Event Log, Security Event Log and System Event Log that are useful for problem analysis.

The rest of this section explains how to view the event files and modify the current paging file and Application Event Log sizes.

Viewing Windows 2000 Dump Information

You access the Application Event Log using the Microsoft Event Viewer:

Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> Event Viewer
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