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Introduction to the Teradata® RDBMS for UNIX® Version 2 Release 2.1 - NCR

NCR Introduction to the Teradata® RDBMS for UNIX® Version 2 Release 2.1 - NCR, 1998. - 315 p.
Download (direct link): inntroduktionteradata1998.pdf
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CharTranslations Shows information about character sets provided by the user.
Columns Shows attributes of columns and parameters of tables, views, and macros.
DataBases Shows characteristics of databases.
Journals[x] Provides information about journal-to-table mapping.
HostInfo Shows information about client systems that are a part of the Teradata RDBMS configuration.
Tables[x] Shows information about tables, views, and macros that have been created in a database.
UserGrantedRights Shows privileges the user has granted to other users.
UserRights Shows privileges the user has been granted on databases, tables, views, and macros.

The following table lists the more important supervisory views with their descriptions.

View Description
AccountInfo[x] Shows accounts that are available to a given user.
Indices[x] Shows the kinds of indexes defined for a given table.
Users Shows information about users that are owned or have been created by a user.

Introduction to the Teradata RDBMS for UNIX

7-3
Data Dictionary

Structure of the Data Dictionary

Administrator Views

The following table lists the more important database administrator views with their descriptions.

View Description
AccessLog Shows information about the access log record.
AccLogRules Shows information about access logging rules that are entered by the BEGIN/END LOGGING statements.
AllRights Shows information about which users have what rights on what objects.
AllSpace[x] Shows AMP-by-AMP information about disk space usage for any database, table, or account. The displayed information includes spool space usage.
AMPUsage Shows AMP-by-AMP information about AMP, CPU, and I/O usage for each user base and account.
Children[x] Shows names of databases and users that are owned by a user.
DeleteAccessLog Shows logged information (over 30 days old) removed from the Access Log table.
DiskSpace[x] Shows AMP-by-AMP information about disk space usage for each database or account. The displayed information includes spool space usage.
ErrorLog Maintains a log of system errors.
LogOnOff Maintains a record of all logon and logoff activity.
LogonRules Shows information about the logon rules entered by the GRANT/REVOKE LOGON statements.
ResUseView Summarizes information about processor utilization that is useful for capacity planning.
SecurityLog[x] Logs all statements entered by all users that affect access rights.
SessionInfo[x] Shows information about users who are currently logged on.
TableSize[x] Shows AMP-by-AMP information about disk space usage (not including spool space) for any database, table, or account.

7-4

Introduction to the Teradata RDBMS for UNIX
Data Dictionary

Structure of the Data Dictionary

Recovery Control User Views

View Description
Journals[x] Shows information about journal-to-table mapping.
Events [x] Provides an audit trail of all archive and recovery activity.
Events_Configuration [x] Shows detail of all archive and recovery activity that did not affect all AMPs.
Events_Media[x] Shows information about archive and recovery events that involve removable media.

The following table lists the more important recovery control user views with their descriptions. The Recovery Control Catalog (RCC) is two tables that contain information about archive and recovery operations.

Introduction to the Teradata RDBMS for UNIX

7-5
Data Dictionary

Using the Data Dictionary

Using the Data Dictionary

This topic describes why you might want to use the DD and then IntroduCtL°n briefly touches on how you can use it.

You use the DD whether you think you do or not. Every time you Why Use the Data log onto the system, every time you perform a SQL query, every

Dictionary? time you type your password, you are using the DD.

The real question is, why should you make queries against the DD tables using the supplied DD views?

IF you are this type of user. . . THEN you might . . .
end want to query the DD to discover the underlying structure of the database and to find what access rights you have granted to others on your databases. A few simple queries of the DD can supply you with all the information you need to formulate complex queries against any table
supervisory need to know how much database space is being used, what sorts of archiving of the database is occurring, and what databases are in the database system.
database administrator need to know about system performance, status and statistics, errors, and accounting

All these users can use the DD to answer their questions.

How do you Access the Data Dictionary?

For security and data integrity reasons, the only SQL DML command you can use on the DD is the SELECT statement. Note: to update the DD database, you must use SQL DDL statements. You can use SELECT to examine any view in the DD to which your administrator has granted access.

The most important thing to know is that you cannot use any of the following SQL commands to alter the DD in any way:
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