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Teradata RDBMS forUNIX SQL Reference - NCR

NCR Teradata RDBMS forUNIX SQL Reference - NCR, 1997. - 913 p.
Download (direct link): teradataforunix1997.pdf
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• Alias object names used in the SELECT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements are verified. The validation occurs only when the SELECT statement is used in a CREATE/REPLACE VIEW statement, and when the SELECT, UPDATE, or DELETE TABLE statement is used in a CREATE/REPLACE MACRO statement.

• Names of work tables and error tables are validated by the MultiLoad and FastLoad client utilities. Refer to the Teradata RDBMS for UNIX Utilities Reference.

Teradata RDBMS for UNIX SQL Reference

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Teradata SQL Lexicon

Rules for Non-ASCII Character Object Names

The following tables illustrate valid and non-valid object names Examples of Kanji Object under each of the predefined character sets for KanjiEBCDIC,

Names 4 KanjiEUC, and KanjiShift-JIS.

Table 4-1

KanjiEBCDIC Object Name Examples

string_expr ASCII Katakana Kanji S2M M2S LEN Result
<ABCDEFGHIJKLMN> 0 0 14 1 1 32 Not Valida
<ABCDEFGHIJ>kl<MN> 2 0 12 2 2 34 Not Validb
<ABCDEFGHIJ>kl<> 2 0 10 2 2 30 Not Validc
<ABCDEFGHIJ><K> 0 0 11 2 2 30 Not Validd
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO 0 15 0 0 0 30 Valid
<ABCDEFGHIJ>KLMNO 0 5 10 1 1 30 Valid
> ΐ < 0 0 1 1 1 6 Not Valide

a. LEN is > 30 bytes.

b. LEN is > 30 bytes

c. Consecutive SO and SI characters are not allowed.

d. Consecutive SI and SO characters are not allowed.

e. The double byte blank is not allowed.

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Teradata RDBMS for UNIX SQL Reference
Teradata SQL Lexicon

Rules for Non-ASCII Character Object Names

Table 4-2

KanjiEUC Object Name Examples

string_expr ASCII Katakana Kanji S2M M2S LEN Result
ABCDEFGHIJKLM 6 0 7 3 3 32 Not Valida
ABCDEFGHIJKLM 6 0 7 2 2 28 Valid
ss2ABCDEFGHIJKL 0 1 11 1 1 27 Valid
Ass2BCDEFGHIJKL 0 1 11 2 2 31 Not Validb
C 3 s s 0 0 0 1 1 4 Not Validc

a. LEN is > 30 bytes.

b. LEN is > 30 bytes

c. Characters from code set 3 are not allowed

Table 4-3

KanjiShift-JIS Object Name Examples

string_expr ASCII Katakana Kanji S2M M2S LEN Result
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQR 6 7 5 1 1 30 Valid
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQR 6 7 5 2 2 31 Not Valida

a. LEN is > 30 bytes.

Teradata RDBMS for UNIX SQL Reference

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Teradata SQL Lexicon

Object Name Translation and Storage

Object Name Translation and Storage

Object names are stored in the dictionary tables using the following translation conventions:

Character Type Description
Single byte All single byte characters in a name, including the KanjiEBCDIC Shift-Out/Shift-In characters, are translated into the Teradata internal representation (based on JIS-x0201 encoding).
Multibyte Multibyte characters in object names are handled according to the character set in effect for the current session, as follows:

Multibyte Character Set Description
KanjiEBCDIC Each multibyte character within the Shift-Out/Shift-In delimiters is stored without translation; that is, it remains in the client encoding. The name string must have matched (but not consecutive) Shift-Out and Shift-In delimiters.
KanjiEUC Under code set 1, each multibyte character is translated from KanjiEUC to KanjiShift-JIS. Under code set 2, byte ss2 (0x8E) is translated to 0x80; the second byte is left unmodified. This translation preserves the relative ordering of code set 0, code set 1, and code set 2.
KanjiShift-JIS Each multibyte character is stored without translation; it remains in the client encoding.

Note: The regular or standard ASCII character set is stored as is. EBCDIC is stored as ASCII.

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Teradata RDBMS for UNIX SQL Reference
Teradata SQL Lexicon

Object Name Comparisons

Comparison Rules

Caution:

Using the Internal Hexadecimal Representation of a Name

Object Name Comparisons

In comparing two names, the following rules apply:

• A simple Latin lowercase letter is equivalent to its corresponding simple Latin uppercase letter. For example, ‘a’ is equivalent to ‘A’.

• Multibyte characters that have the same logical presentation but have different physical encodings under different character sets do not compare as equivalent.

• Two names compare as identical when their internal hexadecimal representations are the same, even if their logical meanings are different under the originating character sets.

Note that identical characters on keyboards connected to different clients are not necessarily identical in their internal encoding on the Teradata RDBMS. The Teradata RDBMS could interpret two logically identical names as different names if the character sets under which they were created are not the same.

For example, the following strings illustrate the internal representation of two names, both of which were defined with the same logical multibyte characters. However, the first name was created under KanjiEBCDIC, and the second name was created under KanjiShift-JIS.

KanjiEBCDIC: 0E 42E3 42C1 42C2 42F1 0F 51 52

KanjiShift-JIS: 8273 8260 8261 8250 D8 D9

It is the user’s responsibility to avoid semantically duplicate object names in situations where duplicate object names would not normally be allowed.
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