Books
in black and white
Main menu
Home About us Share a book
Books
Biology Business Chemistry Computers Culture Economics Fiction Games Guide History Management Mathematical Medicine Mental Fitnes Physics Psychology Scince Sport Technics
Ads

Linux for dummies - Klimas M.

Klimas M. Linux for dummies - Wiley publishing , 2002. - 169 p.
Download (direct link): linuxfordummies2002.pdf
Previous << 1 .. .. 104110 111 112 113 114 115 < 116 > 117

protect your data and keep your system functioning in case of a disk failure. Linux comes with a set of RAID tools that let you
custom-design a RAID system to suit your particular needs.The pieces of RAID on Linux are:
mkraid - initializes/upgrades RAID device arrays
raid0run - starts up old (superblock-less) RAID0/LINEAR arrays
raidstart - command set to manage md devices
raidstop - command set to manage md devices
raidtab - configuration file for md (RAID) devices
RAID operates by joining two or more disks into a single logical device. There are several layers of RAID:
RAID 0 layer ("striping'jjust joins two or more disks into a single logical device, without giving any redundancy. It is often used to join RAID 1 or RAID 5 layers. RAID 0 + RAID 1 is called RAID 10. RAID 0 + RAID 5 is called RAID 50.
RAID 1 (mirroring) combines two disks, each containing the same data.
RAID 4 combines three or more disks, with one of the disks dedicated to parity. If any disk fails, the whole logical device remains available, but with degraded performance. It is not used very often because of the performance.
RAID 5 combines three or more disks, with parity distributed accross the disks. Functionality similar to RAID 4 but apparently better performance.
Try http://www.osfaq.com/vol1/linux softraid.htm for more information.
Part 7: Learning with Linux
160
Linux Newbie Guide by Stan, Peter and Marie Klimas
01/08/2003
RH7.2 gives me an option to set up a software raid almost automatically during the initial operationg system installation procedure. The (simple) procedure is outlined at
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-7.2-Manual/custom-guide/software-raid.html. Briefly, during RH installation, part "partition the hard drive" :
(1) Create new partition(s) of the type "software RAID" You will not be able to specify a mount point for the individual "RAID-type" partitions. You can specify the size for each partition, make it "growable", or force it to be the primary partition.
(2) Press the "Make RAID" button on the Disk Druid screen.
(3) Into the dialog box which appears enter: the mount point for the RAID array, the partition type for the RAID array, the RAID type (you can select between RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 5), the RAID member partitions (which you created in (1)), and the number of spares (for RAID 1 or 5). (The "spare" is the partition that will be automatically used should the the software RAID fail. In (1), you should have created at least one "RAID-type" partition + one "RAID-type" partition for each spare.)
(4) Click "OK", and inspect the "Drive Summary" if your RAID array appears correctly.
Note: "If you are making a RAID partition of /boot, you must choose RAID level 1 and it must use one of the first two drives (IDE first, SCSI second). If you are not creating a RAID partition of /boot, and you are making a RAID partition of /, it must be RAID level 1 and it must use one of the first two drives (IDE first, SCSI second)"
Network traffic shaping using shapecfg
Nice info can be found at: http://oreilly.linux.com/pub/a/linux/2000/08/24/LinuxAdmin.html
Unlikely I will really ever need traffic shaping on my home network, yet it makes an interesting exercise for the curious.
Go to Appendix: How to Upgrade the Kernel Back to Main Menu
Part l: Learning with Linux
161
Licence, Acknowledgments, etc.
LNAG LICENCE
The Linux Newbie Administrator Guide (LNAG) ("The Guide") is distributed under the Open Content Licence (http://opencontent.org/openpub/) with the following addition:
THE GUIDE IS BEING INCREMENTALLY UPDATED. THEREFORE, TO PROVIDE THE BEST VALUE TO OUR READERS, UNLESS THE GUIDE HAS BEEN SUBSTANTIALLY MODIFIED BY AUTHOR(S) OTHER THAN THE ORIGINAL GUIDE AUTHORS, ANY DISTRIBUTOR SHALL DISTRIBUTE A REASONABLY RECENT VERSION OF THE GUIDE, I.E., ITS MOST RECENT VERSION OR A VERSION NOT OLDER THEN ONE YEAR ON THE DATE OF WEB SERVING, CD WRITING, OR HARD COPY PRINTING. THE MOST RECENT VERSION OF THE GUIDE IS AVAILABLE AT HTTP://SUNSITE.DK/LINUX-NEWBIE.
THIS LICENCE MEANS THAT ANY PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE MIRROR MUST BE UPDATED AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR, IF A NEWER VERSION OF THE GUIDE IS AVAILABLE. PLEASE DO NOT CREATE A MIRROR IF YOU DO NOT INTEND TO UPDATE IT.
All the code examples are distributed under the GNU General Public Licence (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html).
The maintainers of this Guide (Stan and Peter Klimas) can be contacted by email: LINUX NAG@CANADA.COM
Acknowledgments
The Linux Newbie Administrator Guide (LNAG) is hosted FREE OF CHARGE on the SunSite server at Aalborg University,
Denmark ( http://sunsite.dk/linux-newbie ). Thanks to Esben Haabendal Soerensen <bart@sunsite.auc.dk>.
Thanks to "linsup.com" (http://linsup.com/) for hosting our free, timely updated Australian mirror at (http://linsup.com/newbie/). Thanks to Kenan Bektas, VP Engineering for hosting our free, timely updated North American mirror:
(http://dbstreams.ca/mirrors/linux-newbie/). Thanks to Andamooka for hosting LNAG among their great free books. We have to figure how to update it.
Previous << 1 .. .. 104110 111 112 113 114 115 < 116 > 117