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Digital photography just the steps for dummies - Jones F.

Jones F. Digital photography just the steps for dummies - Wiley publishing , 2005. - 240 p.
ISBN: 0-7645-7477-9
Download (direct link): digitalphotographyjust2005.pdf
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Chapter 2: Setting Up and Using the Camera
Lengthen Depth of Field
1. Set the mode dial or buttons on your camera to the Aperture Priority mode.
2. Set the aperture of the camera according to the manufacturer's manual.
A larger aperture or smaller f-stop setting reduces the depth of field; a larger f-stop increases it, as shown in Figure 2-9.
3. Compose your shot.
4. Press the shutter button down halfway to allow the camera to adjust.
5. Press the button down fully to take your photo.
Use Shutter Priority Mode
1. Set the mode dial or buttons on your camera to the Shutter Speed Priority mode.
2. Set the shutter speed of the camera according to the manufacturer's manual.
#Use shorter shutter speeds when you're holding the camera. Doing so helps to eliminate blurriness due to jiggling the camera. On the other hand, if you're using a tripod, you can afford to use longer shutter speeds.
3. Compose your shot.
4. Press the shutter button down halfway to allow the camera to adjust.
5. Press the button down fully to take your photo.
Figure 2-9: Lengthening depth of field keeps the background in focus
Two camera functions adjust for depth of field. One is the aperture setting, which controls the actual size of the small opening behind the lens that directs light to the image chip that captures the image. The other is shutter speed, which determines how long the shutter stays open. In Aperture Priority mode, you can increase depth of field (bringing distant objects into focus) by selecting a larger aperture setting or decrease it (blurring distant objects to focus attention only on your subject) by selecting a smaller aperture setting. The camera then automatically chooses the correct shutter speed based on the aperture you choose and the prevailing light conditions.
Shutter speed and aperture size combine to freeze movement in action shots without blurring the picture. The shutter speed is the more important of the two, because the faster the shutter opens and closes, the shorter the moment in time that you capture.
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Use a Tripod
Reduce Battery Usage
1. To set your camera in battery saving mode, access the camera setup menu. Most cameras have settings for the following options:
LED on and off: Shuts the LED display off. You can shoot in this mode using the viewfinder and save power.
LED brightness: If you turn the brightness down, it conserves energy.
Flash on and off: The flash takes a lot of power. Turn it off if you're shooting outdoors.
Auto power shut-off: Automatically turns the camera power off after an interval to save power.
2. Choose the settings for your situation and save them to memory.
Turn off your camera's power whenever you're not using it. Also remember to carry spare, recharged batteries with you.
Use a Tripod
1. Most tripods include a quick connect plate. Attach the camera to the quick connect plate.
2. Adjust the legs of the tripod to the height you wish to use.
3. Adjust the head and camera angle until you achieve the view you want and snap your photos, as shown in Figures 2-10 and 2-11.
Figure 2-10: Shooting a horizontal picture on a tripod
Figure 2-11: Shooting a vertical picture on a tripod
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Chapter 2: Setting Up and Using the Camera
Use a Flash Attachment
1. Select the appropriate flash for your needs. Virtually all digital cameras, except the most professional, come with a built-in flash. Midrange and professional cameras usually allow the addition of external flashes, as illustrated in Figure 2-12.
# Built-in flashes are easy to use and convenient. The down side is their limited range and fixed position. Pointing an external flash slightly away from the subject can eliminate red eye, washed-out shadows, and flattened textures. Use these larger flashes when the shot requires more light or more control of the light. Reposition flashes when you need to; if it's connected with cables, hold the flash by hand for more flexibility.
2. Attach the flash to your camera. Several attachment options on those digital cameras are capable of using external flashes. They are
Hot shoe: The top of most better cameras comes with an accessory shoe, illustrated in Figure 2-13, that has a power and control connection when the flash is snapped into the shoe. Cameras with "cold" or unpowered accessory shoes require the use of a cable from the flash to the camera.
Sync Connector: Most cameras with external flash capability can accept a flash mounted on a special bracket that fastens to the tripod socket on the bottom of the camera. Connect these flashes to power and the camera controls with a supplied cable.
3. Adjust the camera setting to recognize and adjust for the use of external flash attachments.
4. Take photos as you normally do.
Figure 2-12: A typical consumer flash attachment
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Use Attachment Lenses
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