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Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Clayton W

Clayton W Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Wiley Publishing, 2005. - 388 p.
ISBN: 0-7645-7491-4
Download (direct link): internetexplorerconstruction2005.pdf
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Window Settings:
^ Icon: Earth.ico ^ Style: Normal
^ Buttons: Both Minimize and Maximize buttons ^ Border: None Skin: None
^ Title: Traditional Browser (or whatever you want)
334 Part VI: The Part of Tens
Figure 29-8:
A traditional browser.
Address Bar Settings:
Location: Top
Background: AddressBar.jpg Go Button: Yes
Menu Bar Settings:
I ^ Menus: All menus and commands
Toolbar Settings:
^ Location: Top ^ Background: Toolbar.jpg
^ Buttons: All buttons, using the HomeButton.jpg, BackButton.jpg, ForwardButton.jpg, StopButton.jpg, RefreshButton.jpg, SearchButton.jpg, and FavoritesButton.jpg images
Status Bar Settings:
^ Location: Bottom ^ Background: StatusBar.jpg ^ Icon: Earth.ico
^ Panels: Clock, Date, and Current URL
Chapter 29: Ten More Browser Ideas 335
Browser Settings:
^ Top: 124 ^ Left: 10 ^ Width: 776 ^ Height: 440
^ Start Site: Anything you want
The Minimal Browser
л*£СО
Sometimes you get overwhelmed with all the stuff they cram into software these days. Whatever happened to the KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) principle of design? If you’re a fan of KISS (the design theory, not the rock group), you’ll love this quick-and-dirty browser design (see Figure 29-9). All the graphics for this project are in the Themes/Minimal directory of this book’s CD-ROM or in the subdirectory where you installed the Browser Construction Kit. Use the following settings to create the browser:
Window Settings:
^ Icon: Earth.ico ^ Style: Normal
^ Buttons: Both Minimize and Maximize buttons ^ Border: None Skin: None
^ Title: Minimal Browser (or whatever you want) Address Bar Settings:
^ Location: Top ^ Background: AddressBar.jpg Go Button: Yes
Menu Bar Settings:
I None
336 Part VI: The Part of Tens
Figure 29-9:
A minimal browser.
Toolbar Settings:
Location: Top Background: Toolbar.jpg
Buttons: Home, Back, Forward, Stop, and Refresh buttons, using the HomeButton.jpg, BackButton.jpg, ForwardButton.jpg, StopButton.jpg, and RefreshButton.jpg images
Status Bar Settings:
Location: Bottom Background: StatusBar.jpg Panels: Current URL
Browser Settings:
Top: 80 ^ Left: 10 ^ Width: 776 ^ Height: 480
Start Site: Anything you want
Chapter 29: Ten More Browser Ideas 337
The Dream Browser
What’s the dream browser? The perfect browser for you, of course.
Unfortunately, I can’t possibly know what you’d include in your dream browser, so you’ll have to fill in the settings for this tenth and final browser yourself. No whining. I’ve told you everything you need to know to use the Browser Construction Kit. Anyway, because this is almost the end of the book, don’t you think it’s about time that I turned the Browser Construction Kit over to you? Yeah, I thought so.
338 Part VI: The Part of Tens
Chapter 30
Ten Tools and Resources for Web Browser Builders
In This Chapter
^ Exploring graphical tools ^ Discovering programming tools ^ Finding programming instructions ^ Updating your computer for security
This book includes everything you need to get started with Internet Explorer customization. However, you can always expand your horizons — and your custom browsers — with new tools and techniques. Such tools include graphics editors and programming languages. In this chapter, you discover ten ways you can add to your custom browser arsenal of software and documentation.
Microsoft Paint
Although this book comes with a trial version of Paint Shop Pro, to keep using that software, you’re going to have to shell out some dough. The truth is, though, that you don’t need such a fancy software package to create browser graphics. Sure, all those extra features provide a computer-full of graphical power, but if you just want to get the job done, quick and easy, you already have all the software you need installed with Windows. Specifically, I’m referring to Microsoft Paint, which features all the basic tools for creating images. You can find Paint in your Programs menu, inside the Accessories folder.
Clicking Paint’s entry in your Start menu brings up its main window. Paint features a small toolbox with tools that can do everything from select parts of a drawing to draw shapes, erase areas, fill shapes with color, and even add
340 Part VI: The Part of Tens
text. Paint also has a few special features — such as Flip, Stretch, and Skew — that manipulate your images in handy ways.
Imageforge
If you want more graphics power than that offered by Paint, but don’t want to mortgage your house for it, you may want to give ImageForge a try. The basic version of this handy graphics editing package is free (yes, free!), but the company also has a Pro version that you can buy at a reasonable price ($28.95) if you want extra features.
To try ImageForge, you must first download it. Point your browser to www.cursorarts.com/ca_imffw.html, which is the Cursor Arts (the publisher) Web page from which you can download the free version. After installing the software, you’ll have a Cursor Arts entry in your Programs menu. Click the ImageForge command in the menu to run the program.
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