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Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Clayton W

Clayton W Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Wiley Publishing, 2005. - 388 p.
ISBN: 0-7645-7491-4
Download (direct link): internetexplorerconstruction2005.pdf
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Select your buttons
f*/ Minimize Button
W Maximize Button
OK | Cancel
Л
9. Turn off the Minimize Button and Maximize Button options and then click OK.
The Browser Construction Kit removes the Minimize and Maximize buttons from the window.
10. Click the Title button.
The Window Title dialog box appears (see Figure 22-5).
226 Part V: Designing Customized Web Browser Projects
Figure 22-5:
The Window Title dialog box.
Figure 22-6:
The kids’ browser with its new border images.
ip Window Title Q0Q
Enter the window ttJe
1 OK Cancel

11. Type Kids Browser into the text box and click OK.
The window’s new title appears in the title bar.
12. Click the Border command in the toolbox.
The Select Border Image dialog box appears.
13. Double-click the KidBorder.bmp image on this book’s CD-ROM. The borders appear in your kid-browser window (see Figure 22-6).
14. Choose FileOSave As.
The Save Browser File dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 22-7.
15. Navigate to where you want to save your browser’s script file and then click Save.
The Browser Construction Kit saves your browser’s data to the selected location, using the window’s title as the filename.
Chapter 22: Coming Up with a Child's Web Browser 227
Figure 22-7:
The Save Browser File dialog box.
Adding the Menu Bar
A menu bar is an important part of most applications. With a kid’s browser, though, you only want to include the commands that a child is likely to need and use. Limiting the available command set helps keep the child from running into trouble. The following steps describe how to add a menu bar to the child’s browser:
1. In the drop-down list below the toolbox, select the Menu Bar command set.
The Menu Bar commands appear in the toolbox.
2. Click the Menu Bar command in the toolbox.
The menu bar appears in the custom browser window.
3. Select the File button in the toolbox.
The File Menu dialog box appears (see Figure 22-8).
Figure 22-8:
The File Menu dialog box.
228 Part V: Designing Customized Web Browser Projects
4. Select the Close menu option and click OK.
The File menu appears in your kid-browser window.
5. Click the View command.
The View Menu dialog box appears.
6. Select the Toolbar, Status Bar, and Full Screen options and then click OK. The View menu appears in your kid-browser window.
7. Click the Tools command in the toolbox.
The Tools Menu dialog box appears.
8. Select the Alarms and Approved List options and then click OK.
The Tools menu appears in your kid-browser window.
9. Click the Help command in the toolbox.
The Help menu appears in your kid-browser window (see Figure 22-9).
10. Choose FileOSave.
The Browser Construction Kit saves your browser’s data.
Your menu bar may be the most important spot to place commands, but the toolbar is the most convenient place for the user to access frequently used commands. The child’s browser needs a basic set of browsing commands in the toolbar so that the child can easily navigate from one Web page to another. Perform the following steps to add a toolbar to your kid browser:
Figure 22-9:
The browser and its menu bar.
Adding the Toolbar
Chapter 22: Coming Up with a Child's Web Browser 229
Figure 22-10:
The Toolbar dialog box.
Figure 22-11:
The Load Toolbar Image dialog box.
1. In the drop-down list below the toolbox, select the Toolbar command set.
The Toolbar commands appear in the toolbox.
2. Click the Toolbar button.
The Toolbar dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 22-10.
3. Select the toolbar’s Top location and then click the Browse button.
The Load Toolbar Image dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 22-11.
4. Double-click the Kid_Toolbar.jpg image on this book’s CD-ROM.
The selected filename appears in the Toolbar dialog box’s Toolbar Image text box.
5. Click OK.
The toolbar appears in the custom browser window.
6. Click the Home command in the toolbox.
The Load Button dialog box appears.
230 Part V: Designing Customized Web Browser Projects
7. Double-click the Kids_Home.jpg image’s filename on this book’s CD-ROM.
The Home button appears in the custom window’s toolbar.
8. Use the Back, Forward, and Stop commands in the toolbox to add the buttons to the toolbar, the same way you added the Home button in Steps 6 and 7.
The image filenames are Kids_Back.jpg, Kids_Forward.jpg, and Kids_Stop.jpg.
Your custom kid browser now has its toolbar buttons, as shown in Figure 22-12.
9. Choose FileOSave.
The Browser Construction Kit saves your browser’s data.
Figure 22-12:
The toolbar and its buttons.
Adding the Address Bar
Web pages feature links that you can click to get to a specific place on the Internet, but you frequently need to get to places that don’t have such convenient links. As you know, you get to such Web sites by typing their addresses into the browser’s address bar. The following steps guide you through the process of adding an address bar to the kids’ browser:
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