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Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Clayton W

Clayton W Internet Explorer Construction Kit for Dummies - Wiley Publishing, 2005. - 388 p.
ISBN: 0-7645-7491-4
Download (direct link): internetexplorerconstruction2005.pdf
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The clock display that appears in your status bar doesn’t actually work. What good is that, you ask? Well, when you compile your browser into the real thing, then the clock works fine. In the editor, though, the clock’s image is not there to show the time, but only to let you know that you’ve added the clock to the status bar.
The Status Bar Timer
Similar to a clock, a timer can help you keep track of your online time. Also, if the browser has been set to run only a limited amount of time each day, the timer reports the amount of time used. Specifically, you can set whether the timer shows the time online for the current Internet session or the time remaining before the browser shuts down.
Figure 8-6:
The Load Status Bar Icon dialog box.
Chapter 8: Pulling Together the Status Bar
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To add a timer to your browser’s status bar, click the Timer button in the toolbox. The Browser Construction Kit then displays the Timer Type dialog box (see Figure 8-7), in which you specify one of three types of timer:
Session timer: Shows the amount of time spent online for each Internet session. That is, every time you run the browser, the timer is reset to 0.
Daily timer: Shows the amount of time spent online for the day. This type of timer is not reset to 0 each time you run the browser, but is instead reset the first time the browser is run each day.
^ Countdown timer: Shows the amount of time remaining before the browser shuts down for the day.
Select the type of timer you want in the dialog box. If you select the countdown timer, you should also type, into the box below the Countdown Timer option, the maximum number of minutes per day allowed online. Click OK, and the Browser Construction Kit adds the timer to your status bar.
Figure 8-7:
The Timer Type dialog box.
If you want to change the timer settings, click the timer’s display in the status bar. When you do, the Timer Type dialog box appears, in which you can make whatever changes you require.
The Status Bar Date
If you spend a really long time online, you may not be sure even what day it is. Okay, that probably doesn’t happen to anyone except me, but it’s always handy to have the date in front of you when you’re working on your computer. In case you haven’t guessed, you can add a date display to your custom browser’s status bar.
Part II: Customizing the Look of the Browser
To add the date, click the Date button in the toolbox. With little fanfare, the Browser Construction Kit adds a date panel to your status bar. Clicking the button again removes the date from the status bar.
The Current URL
For some strange reason, some people like to see the name of the document that they’re currently viewing in the browser pane. Why anyone should care about such minor details is beyond me, but being the reasonable guy I am, I went ahead and added a Current URL display to the status bar’s list of cool panels.
To add the current URL display, click the Current URL button in the toolbox. The Browser Construction Kit adds a URL panel to your status bar. As you probably already know (but just in case, I’ll tell you anyway), clicking the button again removes the URL display from the status bar.
Chapter 9
Customizing the Address Bar
In This Chapter
^ Exploring the Address Bar command category ^ Adding an address bar ^ Adding a Go button ^ Specifying favorite URLs
Г he address bar is one of the most important elements of your browser window because the address bar is where the browser’s user types the URLs to which he wants to connect. Not having an address bar in your browser is a lot like not having a steering wheel in your car. Of course, as is typical with the Browser Construction Kit, you can choose whether you want an address bar. Some custom browsers may not need one. For example, if you’re creating a browser that’s limited to viewing a single Web site, an address bar is as pointless as a monkey in an aquarium. In this chapter, you find out all about a custom browser’s address bar element.
The Address Bar Command Category
As with all the Browser Construction Kit commands, the Kit organizes the address bar commands into their own category, which is, logically enough, named Address Bar. To manipulate your browser’s address bar, first select the Address Bar command category in the Browser Construction Kit’s editor, as shown in Figure 9-1. When you do, you see the following buttons in the toolbox:
Go Button: Adds a Go button to the address bar. Clicking this button causes the browser to connect with the URL currently entered into the address bar’s text box.
Favorite 1: Adds a button that enables the user to quick-select the URL that you’ve assigned to the button.
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Part II: Customizing the Look of the Browser
Favorite 2: Adds a button that enables the user to quick-select the URL that you’ve assigned to the button.
Favorite 3: Adds a button that enables the user to quick-select the URL that you’ve assigned to the button.
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