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Organic Synteses vol 70 - Meyers A.I.

Meyers A.I. , Boecman R.K. Organic Synteses vol 70 - John Wiley & Sons, 1992. - 163 p.
ISBN 0-471-57743
Download (direct link): organicsynthesesvol701992.pdf
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Waste Disposal Information
All toxic materials were disposed of in accordance with "Prudent Practices for Disposal of Chemicals from Laboratories"; National Academy Press; Washington, DC, 1983.
3. Discussion
Nitrones are highly versatile synthetic intermediates and excellent spin trapping reagents.2 In particular, nitrones are excellent 1,3-dipoles3 and have been used for the synthesis of various nitrogen-containing biologically active compounds.33-313 The preparation of nitrones has been performed either by condensation of aldehydes or ketones with hydroxylamines,4 or by oxidation of the corresponding hydroxylamines.5 The difficulty of these methods is in the preparation of the starting hydroxylamines. For example, cyclic hydroxylamines are prepared from the corresponding cyclic amines via thermal decomposition of the corresponding tertiary amine N-oxides.6
The present procedure provides a single step synthesis of nitrones from secondary amines.7 Typical results of the preparation of nitrones are summarized in Table I. If necessary, the nitrones are easily purified by distillation, recrystallization, or column chromatography. Selenium dioxide is also an effective catalyst for the oxidation of secondary amines with hydrogen peroxide to give nitrones.8 1,3-Dipolar
268
cycloadducts are obtained directly by the oxidation of secondary amines in the presence of alkenes.
The reaction of nitrones with various nucleophiles provides a powerful strategy for the introduction of a substituent at the a-position of secondary amines.9 The reaction of nitrones with Grignard reagents or organolithium compounds affords various a-substituted hydroxylamines, which can be converted into a-substituted secondary amines by catalytic hydrogenation. The nucleophilic reaction with potassium cyanide gives a-cyanohydroxylamines which are useful precursors for amino acids and N-hydroxyamino acids.10
1. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560, Japan.
2. For reviews of nitrone chemistry, see: (a) Breuer, E. In "The Chemistry of Amino, Nitroso and Nitro Compounds and Their Derivatives"; Patai, S., Ed., Wiley, 1982; Part 1, pp. 459-564; (b) Tennant, G. In "Comprehensive Organic Chemistry"; Barton, D. H. R.; Ollis, W. D., Eds.; Pergamon Press, 1979; Vol. 2, pp. 500-510; (c) Hamer, J.; Macaluso, A. Chem. Rev. 1964, 64, 473-495.
3. (a) Tufariello, J. J. In "1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Chemistry"; Padwa, A., Ed.; Wiley, 1984; Vol. 2, pp. 83-168; (b) Tufariello, J. J. Acc. Chem. Res. 1979, 12, 396-403; (c) Black, D. St. C.; Crazier, R. F.; Davis, V. C. Synthesis 1975, 205-221.
4. Sandler, S. R.; Karo, W. "Organic Functional Group Preparations"; Academic Press, 1983; Vol. 3, pp. 351-377.
5. Murahashi, S.-l.; Mitsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Zenki, S.-i. Tetrahedron Lett. 1983,
24, 1049-1052, and references cited therein.
6. (a) Thesing, J.; Sirrenberg, W. Chem. Ber. 1959, 92, 1748-1755; (b) Thesing, J.; Mayer, H. Justus Liebigs Ann. Chem. 1957, 609, 46-57.
269
7. Murahashi, S.-l.; Mitsui, H.; Shiota, T.; Tsuda, T.; Watanabe, S. J. Org Chem. 1990, 55, 1736-1744.
8. Murahashi, S.-l.; Shiota, T. Tetrahedron Lett. 1987, 28, 2383-2386.
9. (a) Meyers, A. I. Aldrichimica Acta 1985, 18, 59-68; (b) Seebach, D.; Enders, D. Angew. Chem., Inter. Ed. Engl. 1975, 14, 15-32.
10. Murahashi, S.-l.; Shiota, T. Tetrahedron Lett. 1987, 28, 6469-6472.
Appendix
Chemical Abstracts Nomenclature (Collective Index Number); (Registry Number)
6-Methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridine N-oxide: Pyridine, 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-6-methyl-,
1-oxide (9); (55386-67-9)
Sodium tungstate dihydrate: Tungstic acid, disodium salt, dihydrate (8,9); (10213-10-2)
2-Methylpiperidine: Piperidine, 2-methyl- (8,9); (109-05-7)
Hydrogen peroxide (8,9); (7722-84-1)
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TABLE
CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF SECONDARY AMINES WITH HYDROGEN PEROXIDE
Amine
Solvent
Product
Yield
(%)
Ph N Ph H
PhCH,0.
PhCH20'
PhCH20.
CH30’
COD
Q
H
Û
CH30H
CH30H
CH30H
CH30H
CH30H
CH30H
CH30H
H20
H20
N'
-U
I
O'
Ph'^'-'rr^Ph
00, xo
PhCH20
COO
o
N
I
CT
Û
*N '
I
Or
89
74
85
85
86
60
62
44
40
27 1
1-PHENYL-2,3,4,5-TETRAMETHYLPHOSPHOLE (1 H-Phosphole, 2,3,4,5-tetramethyl-l-phenyl-)
(T1-C5H5)2ZrCl2 2-Butyne, BuLi
/^0.7 PhPCb _
(T1-C5H5)2ZQ
Submitted by Paul J. Fagan and William A. Nugent.1 Checked by Mark S. Jensen and James D. White.
1. Procedure
A 500-mL, three-necked, round-bottomed ilask equipped with a magnetic stirring bar, rubber septum-capped pressure-equalizing addition funnel on the center neck, rubber septum on one side neck, and a nitrogen inlet with stopcock on the other side neck is charged in a nitrogen-filled glove box (Note 1) with 27.0 g (92.5 mmol) of zirconocene dichloride [(ri-CsHs^ZrCte) (Note 2), 150 mL of tetrahydrofuran (Note 3), and 16.0 mL (204 mmol) of 2-butyne (Note 4) added via syringe. The apparatus is removed from the glove box and attached via the nitrogen stopcock to a nitrogen bubbler. The flask is cooled to -78°C (dry ice-acetone bath) and 108 mL of 1.72 M butyllithium (186 mmol) in hexane (Note 5) is added via syringe to the addition funnel through the septum. The butyllithium solution is added dropwise to the stirred mixture in the flask. After the addition is complete, the reaction mixture is stirred at -78°C for 10 min (Note 6). The flask is allowed to warm by removing the dry ice-acetone bath, and
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