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Chemistry of Detonations - Kamlet M.J.

Kamlet M.J., Jacobs S.J. Chemistry of Detonations - Maryland, 1967. - 28 p.
Download (direct link): chemistryofdetonations1967.djvu
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III. COMPARISON OF EQ. (1) WITH EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS
In view of the above, we do not feel qualified to exercise any form of discrimination in the choice of the experimental measurements which are compared with calculations from Eq. (1) in Table I. All published results which have come to our attention have been included; old data are weighed equally with the new, and results, from our own laboratories, equally with those from other sources. Where the same experiments have been subjected to different interpretations, both sets of conclusions are listed together. Values of ü used in the calculations were estimated from the Í20-Ñ0ã arbitrary according to Eqs. (13)-(15) of Ref. 1.
The 80 data sets in Table I were taken from 17 references, and they represent measurements at loading densities from 0.95 to 1.90 g/cc on 13 explosive compounds and 14 binary mixtures of three general types. In many instances, the data were from secondary sources, because the primary reference had not yet been published or was unavailable to us for other reasons, so that exact experimental conditions of the measurements were not known. In consequence, we have no knowledge whether these are intended to represent “ideal1* (infinite diameter) results. Table I also includes a number of cases, usually involving TNT or RDX/TNT mixtures, where two separate reports from the same laboratory quote results wherein loading densities differ only in the fourth significant figure and detonation pressures only in the third. We are uncertain whether these data derive from separate experiments or from different “rounding off" of numerical information from the same experiments, and the table may therefore contain unintentional duplication.
21 A widespread bias toward accepting the highest pressure quoted for a given explosive at a given loading density may he unwarranted if Petrone’s conclusions (Ref. 18) are correct: In part, the problem may be stated as follows: free-surface velocities are measured with successively thinner plates and plots of valocity vs plate thickness serve as a basis for determining the Chapman-Jouguet state. With very thin plates, a marked increase in slope is observed. Higher pressures are adduced by considering the thinner-plate rather than the thicker-plate portions of the plot.
** A. N. Dremin, V. M. Zaitzev, V. S. Ilyukhin, and P. F. Pokhil, Symp. Combust. 8th, Pasadena, Calif., 1960, 610 (1962).
Table I. Comparison of Eq. (1) with experimental C—J detonation pressures.
Explosive* P»*pti ^ealo % ^expU/We1
P# (kbar) [Eq. [1)3 diff
1. TNT,^wrb=4.S38
0.95b 62.2 68.0 +9.3 14.25
1.00b 76.3 75.4 -1.2 15.77
1.00b 78.5 75.4 -3.9 16.23
1.59b 179.0 190.6 +6.4 14.64
1.00 64 75.4 + 17.8* 13.22*
1.14* 94 97.9 +4.1 14.95
1.30° 123 127.4 +3.6 15.04
1.45° 162 158.5 -2.2 15.92
1.59° 202 190.6 -5.6 16.52
1.64d 177 202.7 +14.5* 13.60*
1.636* 188.4 201.7 +7.1 14.55
1.64f 190 202.7 +6.7 14.60
1.614* 189 196.4 +3.9 15.00
1.621* 210 197.8 -5.8 16.54
1.622» 187.2 198.3 +5.9 14.71
1,62* 212 197.8 -6.7 16.70
1.632k 213 200.7 -5.8 16.53
1.6301 220 200.4 -8.9 17.11
1.63“ /225> 200.4 -10.9 17.50
n I193/ 200.4 +3.8 15,01
1.445» /1781° 157.3 -11.6* 17.61*
n \l 56/ 157.3 +0.8 15.44
1.051" 115 83.2 -27.7* 21.51*
23 data sets (±7.57) (15.78)
19/23 data sets, excluding*, (±5.40) (15.63)
2. RDX, = 6,784 _
1.7671 338 329.9 -2.4 15.96
1.80b- i 390 342.5 -12.2* 17.77*
11755* 366 325.5 -11.1 17.51
1.59* 287 267.1 -6.9 16.73
1.40* 213 207.1 -2.8 16.02
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